Arizona Elections

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Upcoming Elections

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Voting Rights

News

Will you have the right to vote in 2016?
02/07/16 |
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 17:15
Excerpt: 

The nationwide push to make it harder to vote began in earnest after the 2010 election, when Republicans gained control of an unprecedented number of states. Their goal was to make the electorate older, whiter and more conservative compared with the younger and more diverse electorate that turned out in record numbers for Barack Obama in 2008.

Although the connection isn't obvious to everyone, these voting restrictions disproportionately affect the core of Obama's political coalition, including young people (some states exclude student IDs from the list of acceptable documents) and minority voters (who are more likely to vote early and less likely than whites to have state-issued IDs). A new study by political scientists at UC San Diego found that “a strict ID law could be expected to depress Latino turnout by 9.3 points, Black turnout by 8.6 points, and Asian American turnout by 12.5 points.” ...

[I]t's not just former Confederate states that have moved to gum up the democratic process. New Hampshire, which will hold its primary on Tuesday, has a new voter ID law on the books. Those without the required ID can still cast a regular ballot by signing an affidavit, but they will have to let poll workers take their pictures, which could lead to voter intimidation and longer lines at the polls. Wait times increased by 50% when the voter ID law was partially implemented, without the camera requirement, during the 2012 election.

Federal official requires citizenship proof for voter registration in 3 states
02/05/16 |
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 00:00
Excerpt: 

A federal elections official has decided – without public notice or review from his agency’s commissioners – that residents of Alabama, Kansas and Georgia can no longer register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of U.S. citizenship. ...

Under the new rule, any resident in those states who registers to vote using the federal form must show citizenship documentation – such as a birth certificate, naturalization papers or passport. In other states, no such documentation is needed to register; voters need only sign a sworn statement. ...

Kansas already had moved ahead with a dual voter-registration system, banning those who registered through the federal form from voting in state and local races. A state court recently ruled Kobach did not have the legislative authority to create such a dual system, but Kobach said Thursday that it’s now a moot point.

Alabama was waiting for EAC guidance to implement a proof-of-citizenship requirement because of questions of authority, state Elections Director Ed Packard said Thursday. He noted that it’s unclear how soon the new rule will be implemented, or what effect it might have.  ...

Georgia hasn’t implemented proof-of-citizenship requirements, and has put no restrictions on voters who register through federal forms, said David Dove, a spokesman for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

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Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

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Helpful Election Information

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Election Day: 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 

Early voting is also available. Early voting starts 26 days before the election and ends at 5:00pm on the Friday before Election Day.

Deadlines for in-person early voting vary by county.

How to Find Your Polling Place

Online polling locations are available through the Arizona Secretary of State website. You may also contact the County Recorder in the county in which you are registered. 

Voters should check with their local election officials to see if they may cast an early ballot at the County Recorder’s office.

Online polling locations are also available through the following counties:

Maricopa County

Pima County

Yavapai County

For other counties, you may contact the County Recorder in the county in which you are registered.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

NOTE: Arizona is currently a party to litigation seeking to allow proof of citizenship when registering to vote and using the federal voter registration form, which conflicts with the Supreme Court’s ruling in Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.  That issue is currently being litigated and the information below may change.

Registration Deadlines

You can register to vote using the printable Arizona Voter Registration form (in English or Spanish) or the Federal Voter Registration form.  The Federal Voter Registration from is available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tagalong, and Vietnamese.

You can also register to vote online in English or Spanish using the Arizona EZ form.

Identification Required for Registration

A completed registration form must contain the following information:

  • Name;
  • Residence address or location;
  • Date of birth;
  • Signature, of if you are unable to sign, a statement that the registration was completed at your request;
  • A checkmark that you answered "yes" to the question regarding citizenship; and
  • Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license number, or the last four digits of your social security number.  If you do not have any of these, you can attest that you do not have these forms of identification, and the Secretary of State will assign you a unique identifying number.

The requirements for proof of citizenship are different depending on whether you used the Federal form or the Arizona form.  You can use either one.

If you use the Federal Registration form you will be required to a state under penalty of perjury that you meet the eligibility requirements, including citizenship.  You do not have to provide any documents to prove citizenship.

If you use the Arizona Voter Registration form, you will have to provide a document proving your citizenship or your registration will be rejected.  Proof of citizenship may be one of the following:

  • The number of an Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996; 
  • Driver’s license or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996 by the department of transportation or the equivalent governmental agency of another state within the United States if the agency indicates on the applicant's driver license or non-operating identification license that the person has provided satisfactory proof of United States citizenship;
  • A legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship that verifies citizenship to the satisfaction of the county recorder and, if needed, supporting legal documentation (for example, a marriage certificate if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as your current legal name); 
  • A legible photocopy of the pertinent pages of your passport; 
  • Presentation to the County Recorder of U.S. naturalization documents or including your Alien Registration Number on the registration form; 
  • Your  Bureau of Indian Affairs card number; 
  • Your tribal treaty card; 
  • Your tribal enrollment number; or
  • A legible photocopy of your Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.

How to Check Registration

To verify your registration, visit the Arizona Secretary of State’s Voter View website, call 1-866-OUR-VOTE or contact your County Elections Official.

If You Want to Vote Early

You can request to vote early and cast an early ballot in-person at the same time.  You can vote early at any early voting location in the county you are registered to vote, or at your County Recorder's office.  Times and dates may vary at locations based on the early voting facilities' business hours.  

Early Voting Begins

 Early voting starts 26 days before the election. 

For information on early voting locations, including times and dates for early voting, contact your County Recorder.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

You can request an early ballot within 93 days of any election.  Some Arizona counties allow requests for early ballots to be made online.  Any voter may vote by early ballot.

In Person: As discussed about, you may visit your county voter registration office, complete an application, and cast your ballot.  The last day for in-person early voting is the Friday before Election Day.

By Mail:  You can request the early ballot application online or by calling, emailing, mailing, or faxing your County Recorder's Officer.  If applying by mail, the county voter registration office must receive the absentee ballot application no later than 5pm on the eleventh day prior to the election. The deadline for receipt of mail-in ballot is 7pm on Election Day. On Election Day, absentee voters can also drop off their mail-in ballot at any polling place in the correct county, as long as it is dropped off before 7pm.

Voters can also request to be added to a permanent early voting list (PEVL) so that they automatically receive a ballot by and don’t have to request for each election cycle (federal, state, and local elections).

If you requested an early ballot by mail but have not yet received your ballot, check the status of your early ballot online.  If you still have questions, contact your County Recorder's Officer.

Rules and Deadlines

The voter must provide his or her name and address, date of birth, and state or country of birth or other information that if compared to the voter registration information on file, would confirm the voter's identity. 

Your County Recorder’s Office must receive your ballot by 7:00p.m. on Election Day (postmark does not matter).  Be sure to carefully follow the instructions on your early ballot.  You may return the ballot personally or by mail. 

You must sign the oath on the envelope used to return the early ballot.  If you need assistance to vote due to blindness, disability, or inability to read or write, you may be given assistance by a person of your choice.  However, this person cannot be your employer or an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union.

Voting in Person After Requesting an Absentee Ballot

If you requested an absentee ballot, you can vote by provisional ballot at your polling place on Election Day if you either bring your early ballot with you to the polls to surrender it, or confirm that you have not voted and will not vote your early ballot.  

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote 

A completed registration form must contain the following information:

  • Name;
  • Residence address or location;
  • Date of birth;
  • Signature, of if you are unable to sign, a statement that the registration was completed at your request;
  • A checkmark that you answered "yes" to the question regarding citizenship; and
  • Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license number, or the last four digits of your social security number.  

If you do not have any of these, you can attest that you do not have these forms of identification, and the Secretary of State will assign you a unique identifying number.

The requirements for proof of citizenship are different depending on whether you used the Federal form or the Arizona form.  You can use either one.

If you use the Federal Registration form you will be required to a state under penalty of perjury that you meet the eligibility requirements, including citizenship.  You do not have to provide any documents to prove citizenship.

If you use the Arizona Voter Registration form, you will have to provide a document proving your citizenship or your registration will be rejected.  Proof of citizenship may be one of the following:

  • The number of an Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996; 
  • Driver’s license or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996 by the department of transportation or the equivalent governmental agency of another state within the United States if the agency indicates on the applicant's driver license or non-operating identification license that the person has provided satisfactory proof of United States citizenship;
  • A legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship that verifies citizenship to the satisfaction of the county recorder and, if needed, supporting legal documentation if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as your current legal name (for example, a marriage certificate); 
  • A legible photocopy of the pertinent pages of your passport; 
  • Present to the County Recorder of U.S. naturalization documents; 
  • Your Alien Registration Number; 
  • Your  Bureau of Indian Affairs card number; 
  • Your tribal treaty card number; 
  • Your tribal enrollment number; or
  • A legible photocopy of your Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

To obtain a ballot at the polling place, the voter must tell or present in writing his or her name and address to an election official.  In addition, the voter must present any of the following three forms of current identification:

1.  One form of photo identification that has his or her name and address as it appears on the voting rolls and a photograph.  These include, but are not limited to:

  • Valid Arizona driver's license;
  • Valid Arizona non-operating identification license;
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification; and
  • Valid United States federal, state, or local government issued identification.

2.  Two different non-photo IDs listing the name and address of the voter that appear to be the same name and address on the voter rolls.  Acceptable forms of non-photo ID include, but are not limited: to:

  • Utility bill of the voter that is dated within ninety days of the date of the election. A utility bill may be for electric, gas, water, solid waste, sewer, telephone, cellular phone, or cable television;
  • Bank or credit union statement that is dated within ninety days of the date of election;
  • Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration;
  • Valid Arizona vehicle insurance card;
  • Indian census card;
  • Property tax statement of the voter's residence;
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification;
  • Recorder's Certificate;
  • Voter registration card; and
  • Valid United States federal, state, or local government issued identification or mailing labeled as “official election material.”

3.  Two different IDs, one with you name and photo, and one with your name and address.

  • One valid photo ID with no address or an address that does not match the voter rolls, AND one of the forms of non-photo ID from List 2; OR
  • A military identification card or valid U.S. passport without an address AND one form of non-photo ID from List 2.

Identification must not have expired by the date of the election, including a voter registration card issued by the county recorder.

If you do not have the required identification, you may vote a provisional ballot.

Changing Your Address

The same registration form used to register a new voter may also be used to file a name or address change. 

A registered voter may also correct his/her residence address by making a written request for an early ballot and notifying the county recorder of the address change.  The written request must contain the following: 

  • a request to change the voter registration record;
  • the voter's new residence address;
  • an affirmation that the information is true and correct; and
  • the voter's signature.

Moving Within the Same County

If you move within the same county but fail to notify the county recorder before the election, you will be allowed to correct your registration address at the polling place for your new address.  To do so, you must:  

  • Present a form of identification that has your full name and new address and
  • Affirm the new residence address in writing.

You will then be able to vote by provisional ballot.

Moving to a Different County

If you move from an election precinct in one county to an election precinct in another county, you must register in the new county of residence at least 29 days before the election to be permitted to vote in the new county.  If you use the state voter registration form, you must show  proof of citizenship.

If you move within the 29-day period before the election, you are considered a resident and registered voter in your old county, you will be considered an elector of the new county starting on the day after the election.

 Moving to a Different State

An Arizona voter who permanently moves out of state within 30 days of a presidential election, may vote for president, but for no other offices, in their old precinct by early ballot, by mail, or in person at the office of the county recorder.

The county recorder will cancel the voter's registration immediately following the election. 

Special services are provided to assist military and overseas civilian voters participate in elections. If you are a military or overseas civilian voter who is eligible to vote in Arizona, you can find out more at the Arizona Secretary of State's site here.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), also known as Standard Form 76, to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Arizona-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can send and receive voting materials by fax and email.  If you wish to use the fax or email options, you must indicate this on your FPCA.  Instructions for doing so are found on the FVAP's Arizona-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they are concerned with receiving their printed ballot and returning it by the 7:00 p.m., Election Day deadline.  The FWAB is a blank ballot on which voters write-in their choices.  The FWAB may also be used  to register to vote and to apply for the absentee ballot, all in one step.  If the FWAB is being used to register to vote, it must be received by the voter registration deadline.  For specific instructions, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's Arizona-specific FWAB page.

In Arizona, a person that has been convicted of ONE felony can have his/her voting rights restored automatically once that person has (1) finished his/her probation or receives absolute discharge from imprisonment, and (2) paid any fine or restitution that they were ordered to pay.

With the exception of those convicted of counterfeiting election returns, no court action is necessary for the person's rights to be restored and the person may register to vote.  Persons convicted of counterfeiting election returns do not have their right to vote automatically restored.

A person convicted of TWO OR MORE felonies does not have his/her rights automatically restored and must petition the court to have that person's rights restored.  If the person was sentenced to prison, this application can be submitted no sooner than two years from the date of absolute discharge.

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

FAQ

Top Issues to Field **not yet been updated since 2014**

For more information for voters with disabilities, visit the National Disability Rights Network’s voting resource center

For more information for student voters, visit the Arizona Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights