Arizona Elections

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Your State

Upcoming Elections

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

  • Voter Registration Deadline: February 22

2016 Congressional/State Primary: August 30

  • Voter Registration Deadline:August 1

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

  • Voter Registration Deadline: October 10

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.


More state specific election info below.

Voting Rights

News

North Carolina: First election with voter ID offers lessons, anxiety
05/26/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, May 26, 2016 - 17:30
Excerpt: 

The March primary was the first election in North Carolina's history in which all voters who cast ballots in person were asked to show an ID. More than 99 percent of voters showed ID or voted by mail, but the fraction that claimed an exemption – a "reasonable impediment" in elections jargon – gave elections officials a snapshot into the difficulties posed by the new law:

  • "She lives in a home and is 90 years old. Unaware of new law. No way to get to DMV."

  • "Domestic violence situation. Did not want person to find her new address."
  • 
"NC ID card has deteriorated and broken, cannot read expiration date on ID card."

  • "Not yet received NC ID"

  • ”House fire."


Documents filed in a lawsuit hoping to weaken the state's voter ID requirement detail several instances of problems at the polls. 2,371 voters showed up to the polls without an ID. That's a fraction of 1 percent of the the 2.3 million people who cast ballots during the primary. While Strach said she would have preferred everyone brought IDs after a two-year, statewide voter education campaign, she said the relatively small number of voters without ID is a reason for optimism.

Of those 2,371 voters who didn't show ID, less than half – 1,048 – claimed a reasonable impediment. Ultimately, 765 reasonable impediment ballots were at least partially counted, according to data posted by the State Board of Elections. The question the State Board of Elections and voting rights advocates will be sorting out next week is what happened to those more than 200 voters who claimed a reasonable impediment but didn't have their vote count.

Critics of voter ID say that the new requirements may just prompt some people to stay home rather than navigate the reasonable impediment rules. "I have no reason to believe that did, because turnout was relatively high," Strach said.

But in state court this month, civil rights attorney Anita Earls argued that the experiences of voters during the March 15 primary showed that voter ID still needs rethinking."There were a number of ways the system broke down," Earls told the court.

For example, Currie, the state case's lead plaintiff who is an elderly, black woman living in Fayetteville, was not offered a reasonable impediment declaration when she first tried to vote.

"Ms. Currie was simply told by a poll worker that she could not vote because she did not have acceptable photo identification," an amended complainant in the case recounts. "Ms. Currie was only able to vote after leaving the polling place on Election Day and after obtaining assistance from a legal intern who drove from Durham to Fayetteville to assist Ms. Currie with the voting process."

Other cases cited in the suit included an Orange County woman who was allowed to vote by showing an out-of-state license, despite rules that indicated she should have been sent through a reasonable impediment process. That shows "that the photo ID requirement for voting is not being implemented uniformly or fairly."

The plaintiffs also cited three other cases in Orange and Robeson counties they said showed voter ID standards are being applied unevenly.

Texas' Voter ID Case Could Change How Voting Works Across the Country
05/25/16 |
Publication Date: 
Tuesday, May 24, 2016 - 13:00
Excerpt: 

Here are a few reasons why Texas' voting rights case deserves your attention:

1. Studies show that enough Americans lack government-issued photo IDs to swing statewide and national elections.

According to the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University, 21 million Americans lacked a government-issued photo ID in 2006, even though they were eligible and registered to vote. More than 600,000 voters in Texas lacked a government ID.

Proponents of ballot box access laws have cited the need to protect against voter fraud, but national voting rights advocates have said the laws are a solution in search of a problem.

2. Texas law recognizes gun licenses as proof of identity for the purposes of voting, but not student IDs.

Texas’ voter ID law would require residents to show one of seven forms of approved identification — which includes military IDs and concealed carry handgun licenses.

The state's law is among the strictest in the nation because it does not recognize university IDs given to college students. 

3. The surge in voter-ID laws began after the Supreme Court gutted the Voting Rights Act in 2013.

The Voting Rights Act of 1965 banned states from passing laws that imposed cumbersome and discriminatory barriers to voting on black and other minority voters. The law required states with a history of racial disenfranchisement to seek federal preclearance before instituting any changes to voting rules and redistricting plans.

Nearly 50 years later, a crop of restrictive voting laws has crept up in Republican-led legislatures across the country. In 2013, the Supreme Court ruled in Shelby County v. Holder that the federal preclearance of voting law changes was no longer needed in a nation that had presumably progressed on racial relations. That's when states such as Missouri, Kansas, Georgia and Ohio began adoptingsweeping changes to voting laws, including voter ID and reducing the number of early voting days.

If Texas' law is allowed to move forward, it could again embolden states to seek new changes that disenfranchise voters, advocates have said.

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Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the voting rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

More Info On Student Voting

Arizona Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

  • Voter Registration Deadline: February 22

2016 Congressional/State Primary: August 30

  • Voter Registration Deadline:August 1

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

  • Voter Registration Deadline: October 10

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Election Day: 6:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. 

Early voting is also available. Early voting starts 26 days before the election and ends at 5:00pm on the Friday before Election Day.

Deadlines for in-person early voting vary by county.

How to Find Your Polling Place

Online polling locations are available through the Arizona Secretary of State website. You may also contact the County Recorder in the county in which you are registered. 

Voters should check with their local election officials to see if they may cast an early ballot at the County Recorder’s office.

Online polling locations are also available through the following counties:

Maricopa County

Pima County

Yavapai County

For other counties, you may contact the County Recorder in the county in which you are registered.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.


NOTE: Arizona is currently a party to litigation seeking to allow proof of citizenship when registering to vote and using the federal voter registration form, which conflicts with the Supreme Court’s ruling in Arizona v. Inter Tribal Council of Arizona.  That issue is currently being litigated and the information below may change.

Registration Deadlines

You can register to vote using the printable Arizona Voter Registration form (in English or Spanish) or the Federal Voter Registration form.  The Federal Voter Registration from is available in English, Spanish, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Tagalong, and Vietnamese.

You can also register to vote online in English or Spanish using the Arizona EZ form.

Identification Required for Registration

A completed registration form must contain the following information:

  • Name;
  • Residence address or location;
  • Date of birth;
  • Signature, of if you are unable to sign, a statement that the registration was completed at your request;
  • A checkmark that you answered "yes" to the question regarding citizenship; and
  • Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license number, or the last four digits of your social security number.  If you do not have any of these, you can attest that you do not have these forms of identification, and the Secretary of State will assign you a unique identifying number.

The requirements for proof of citizenship are different depending on whether you used the Federal form or the Arizona form.  You can use either one.

If you use the Federal Registration form you will be required to a state under penalty of perjury that you meet the eligibility requirements, including citizenship.  You do not have to provide any documents to prove citizenship.

If you use the Arizona Voter Registration form, you will have to provide a document proving your citizenship or your registration will be rejected.  Proof of citizenship may be one of the following:

  • The number of an Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996; 
  • Driver’s license or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996 by the department of transportation or the equivalent governmental agency of another state within the United States if the agency indicates on the applicant's driver license or non-operating identification license that the person has provided satisfactory proof of United States citizenship;
  • A legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship that verifies citizenship to the satisfaction of the county recorder and, if needed, supporting legal documentation (for example, a marriage certificate if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as your current legal name); 
  • A legible photocopy of the pertinent pages of your passport; 
  • Presentation to the County Recorder of U.S. naturalization documents or including your Alien Registration Number on the registration form; 
  • Your  Bureau of Indian Affairs card number; 
  • Your tribal treaty card; 
  • Your tribal enrollment number; or
  • A legible photocopy of your Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.

How to Check Registration

To verify your registration, visit the Arizona Secretary of State’s Voter View website, call 1-866-OUR-VOTE or contact your County Elections Official.

If You Want to Vote Early

You can request to vote early and cast an early ballot in-person at the same time.  You can vote early at any early voting location in the county you are registered to vote, or at your County Recorder's office.  Times and dates may vary at locations based on the early voting facilities' business hours.  

Early Voting Begins

 Early voting starts 26 days before the election. 

For information on early voting locations, including times and dates for early voting, contact your County Recorder.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

You can request an early ballot within 93 days of any election.  Some Arizona counties allow requests for early ballots to be made online.  Any voter may vote by early ballot.

In Person: As discussed about, you may visit your county voter registration office, complete an application, and cast your ballot.  The last day for in-person early voting is the Friday before Election Day.

By Mail:  You can request the early ballot application online or by calling, emailing, mailing, or faxing your County Recorder's Officer.  If applying by mail, the county voter registration office must receive the absentee ballot application no later than 5pm on the eleventh day prior to the election. The deadline for receipt of mail-in ballot is 7pm on Election Day. On Election Day, absentee voters can also drop off their mail-in ballot at any polling place in the correct county, as long as it is dropped off before 7pm.

Voters can also request to be added to a permanent early voting list (PEVL) so that they automatically receive a ballot by and don’t have to request for each election cycle (federal, state, and local elections).

If you requested an early ballot by mail but have not yet received your ballot, check the status of your early ballot online.  If you still have questions, contact your County Recorder's Officer.

Rules and Deadlines

The voter must provide his or her name and address, date of birth, and state or country of birth or other information that if compared to the voter registration information on file, would confirm the voter's identity. 

Your County Recorder’s Office must receive your ballot by 7:00p.m. on Election Day (postmark does not matter).  Be sure to carefully follow the instructions on your early ballot.  You may return the ballot personally or by mail. 

You must sign the oath on the envelope used to return the early ballot.  If you need assistance to vote due to blindness, disability, or inability to read or write, you may be given assistance by a person of your choice.  However, this person cannot be your employer or an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union.

Voting in Person After Requesting an Absentee Ballot

If you requested an absentee ballot, you can vote by provisional ballot at your polling place on Election Day if you either bring your early ballot with you to the polls to surrender it, or confirm that you have not voted and will not vote your early ballot.  

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote 

A completed registration form must contain the following information:

  • Name;
  • Residence address or location;
  • Date of birth;
  • Signature, of if you are unable to sign, a statement that the registration was completed at your request;
  • A checkmark that you answered "yes" to the question regarding citizenship; and
  • Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license number, or the last four digits of your social security number.  

If you do not have any of these, you can attest that you do not have these forms of identification, and the Secretary of State will assign you a unique identifying number.

The requirements for proof of citizenship are different depending on whether you used the Federal form or the Arizona form.  You can use either one.

If you use the Federal Registration form you will be required to a state under penalty of perjury that you meet the eligibility requirements, including citizenship.  You do not have to provide any documents to prove citizenship.

If you use the Arizona Voter Registration form, you will have to provide a document proving your citizenship or your registration will be rejected.  Proof of citizenship may be one of the following:

  • The number of an Arizona driver's license number, or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996; 
  • Driver’s license or non-operating license issued after October 1, 1996 by the department of transportation or the equivalent governmental agency of another state within the United States if the agency indicates on the applicant's driver license or non-operating identification license that the person has provided satisfactory proof of United States citizenship;
  • A legible photocopy of a birth certificate that verifies citizenship that verifies citizenship to the satisfaction of the county recorder and, if needed, supporting legal documentation if the name on the birth certificate is not the same as your current legal name (for example, a marriage certificate); 
  • A legible photocopy of the pertinent pages of your passport; 
  • Present to the County Recorder of U.S. naturalization documents; 
  • Your Alien Registration Number; 
  • Your  Bureau of Indian Affairs card number; 
  • Your tribal treaty card number; 
  • Your tribal enrollment number; or
  • A legible photocopy of your Tribal Certificate of Indian Blood or Tribal or Bureau of Indian Affairs Affidavit of Birth.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

To obtain a ballot at the polling place, the voter must tell or present in writing his or her name and address to an election official.  In addition, the voter must present any of the following three forms of current identification:

1.  One form of photo identification that has his or her name and address as it appears on the voting rolls and a photograph.  These include, but are not limited to:

  • Valid Arizona driver's license;
  • Valid Arizona non-operating identification license;
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification; and
  • Valid United States federal, state, or local government issued identification.

2.  Two different non-photo IDs listing the name and address of the voter that appear to be the same name and address on the voter rolls.  Acceptable forms of non-photo ID include, but are not limited: to:

  • Utility bill of the voter that is dated within ninety days of the date of the election. A utility bill may be for electric, gas, water, solid waste, sewer, telephone, cellular phone, or cable television;
  • Bank or credit union statement that is dated within ninety days of the date of election;
  • Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration;
  • Valid Arizona vehicle insurance card;
  • Indian census card;
  • Property tax statement of the voter's residence;
  • Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification;
  • Recorder's Certificate;
  • Voter registration card; and
  • Valid United States federal, state, or local government issued identification or mailing labeled as “official election material.”

3.  Two different IDs, one with you name and photo, and one with your name and address.

  • One valid photo ID with no address or an address that does not match the voter rolls, AND one of the forms of non-photo ID from List 2; OR
  • A military identification card or valid U.S. passport without an address AND one form of non-photo ID from List 2.

Identification must not have expired by the date of the election, including a voter registration card issued by the county recorder.

If you do not have the required identification, you may vote a provisional ballot.

Changing Your Address

The same registration form used to register a new voter may also be used to file a name or address change. 

A registered voter may also correct his/her residence address by making a written request for an early ballot and notifying the county recorder of the address change.  The written request must contain the following: 

  • a request to change the voter registration record;
  • the voter's new residence address;
  • an affirmation that the information is true and correct; and
  • the voter's signature.

Moving Within the Same County

If you move within the same county but fail to notify the county recorder before the election, you will be allowed to correct your registration address at the polling place for your new address.  To do so, you must:  

  • Present a form of identification that has your full name and new address and
  • Affirm the new residence address in writing.

You will then be able to vote by provisional ballot.

Moving to a Different County

If you move from an election precinct in one county to an election precinct in another county, you must register in the new county of residence at least 29 days before the election to be permitted to vote in the new county.  If you use the state voter registration form, you must show  proof of citizenship.

If you move within the 29-day period before the election, you are considered a resident and registered voter in your old county, you will be considered an elector of the new county starting on the day after the election.

 Moving to a Different State

An Arizona voter who permanently moves out of state within 30 days of a presidential election, may vote for president, but for no other offices, in their old precinct by early ballot, by mail, or in person at the office of the county recorder.

The county recorder will cancel the voter's registration immediately following the election. 

Special services are provided to assist military and overseas civilian voters participate in elections. If you are a military or overseas civilian voter who is eligible to vote in Arizona, you can find out more at the Arizona Secretary of State's site here.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), also known as Standard Form 76, to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Arizona-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can send and receive voting materials by fax and email.  If you wish to use the fax or email options, you must indicate this on your FPCA.  Instructions for doing so are found on the FVAP's Arizona-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they are concerned with receiving their printed ballot and returning it by the 7:00 p.m., Election Day deadline.  The FWAB is a blank ballot on which voters write-in their choices.  The FWAB may also be used  to register to vote and to apply for the absentee ballot, all in one step.  If the FWAB is being used to register to vote, it must be received by the voter registration deadline.  For specific instructions, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's Arizona-specific FWAB page.

In Arizona, a person that has been convicted of ONE felony can have his/her voting rights restored automatically once that person has (1) finished his/her probation or receives absolute discharge from imprisonment, and (2) paid any fine or restitution that they were ordered to pay.

With the exception of those convicted of counterfeiting election returns, no court action is necessary for the person's rights to be restored and the person may register to vote.  Persons convicted of counterfeiting election returns do not have their right to vote automatically restored.

A person convicted of TWO OR MORE felonies does not have his/her rights automatically restored and must petition the court to have that person's rights restored.  If the person was sentenced to prison, this application can be submitted no sooner than two years from the date of absolute discharge.

For more information, visit the Arizona Secretary of State website.

FAQ

Top Issues to Field **not yet been updated since 2014**

For more information for voters with disabilities, visit the National Disability Rights Network’s voting resource center

For more information for student voters, visit the Arizona Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

2016 Election Information for your state