Wyoming Elections

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Winning in court, losing on the ground: uncertainty clouds U.S. voting rights
10/27/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 15:45

U.S. voting rights advocates scored a string of courtroom victories this year that rolled back some of the nation's most restrictive voting laws. Now they face another challenge: making sure those rulings are not undermined by officials who oversee elections at the local level.

With early voting already under way ahead of the Nov. 8 election, local officials in several states are trying to enforce restrictions that have been suspended or struck down in court, civil rights advocates say. In some cases, the action appears to be the result of bureaucratic confusion. In other cases, they appear to be actively resisting the law.

Wisconsin DMV must track down voters
10/27/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, October 27, 2016 - 10:30

The state Department of Motor Vehicles must try to track down about 50 people who had their voting credentials returned as undeliverable, according to a federal judge’s order this week.

As part of litigation over Wisconsin’s voter ID law, the DMV sent voting credentials to people who had difficulty getting IDs because they lack birth certificates or have other challenges to proving their identity. But credentials some were returned as undeliverable....

“The DMV must attempt to contact family members or associates of the petitioner using whatever contact information is available,” [U.S. District Judge James Peterson] wrote. “Heroic measures are not required, but the DMV must at least attempt to contact the family or friends of those petitioners who are entitled to a voting credential but have not received them.”

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Wyoming Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 General Election:  November 8, 2016

Voter Registration Deadline: Received by October 25, 2016.

Voters may also register and vote at their polling place on Election Day.

Wyoming does not offer online voter registration.

For more information, visit the Wyoming Secretary of State’s website

Election Day:

Polls are open from 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.

Absentee voters may vote in person at the County Clerk’s office or by mail no sooner than 40 days before Election Day. Absentee ballots must be received by the county clerk no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.

How to Find Your Polling Place: Visit the Wyoming Secretary of State’s polling place locator webpage to determine where you vote.


Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.

Registration Deadlines: Voters seeking to register prior to the election must do so not less than 14 days prior to the date of election. For the 2016 Presidential Election, this deadline is October 25, 2016. Voters may also register at their polling place on Election Day. 

How to Check Your Registration: Contact your County Clerk’s office to verify if you are registered to vote or call 866-OUR-VOTE.

Registration Eligibility: In order to be eligible to register in Wyoming, you must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States;
  • Be at least 18 years old on or before Election Day;
  • Be a resident of Wyoming;
  • Not currently be found mentally incompetent;
  • Not have been convicted of a felony, or if convicted had your voting rights restored;

Wyoming considers your residence to be the place where you have a current habitation and to which, whenever you are away, you have the intention of returning.

How to Register: Wyoming residents may register either at a county clerk’s office or by mail. Voter registration application forms and accompanying instruction can be found on the Secretary of State’s website

Identification Required for Registration

Preferred option

Second option if you don’t have valid Wyoming driver’s license

Third option: 2 of any of the following documents

Valid Wyoming driver’s license

Different state’s driver’s license; ID issued by a local, state or federal agency; U.S. passport; school ID; military ID

Certificate of US citizenship or naturalization; draft record; voter registration card from another state or county; original or certified copy of birth certificate bearing an official seal; certificate of birth abroad issued by U.S. State Department; any other form of ID issued by an official agency

Wyoming makes no distinction between absentee voting and early voting. Voters who wish to vote early may do so by absentee voting in person at their Clerk of Court’s office. For more information on absentee voting, visit the Secretary of State’s absentee voting information page.

Rules and Deadlines:

  • Voters may apply for absentee ballots any time during the calendar year in which the election is held, but not on Election Day.
  • An absentee ballot must be received by the County Clerk no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day.

If you previously registered in person, or registered by mail and have voted before in a Wyoming federal election, you are not required to show ID at the polls. If you registered by mail and are voting in your first federal election, you must provide a current, valid photo ID or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document showing their name and address.

VoteRiders has created Wyoming voter ID info cards in English and in Spanish.

Moving within the Same County

If you have changed addresses since registering to vote and your new address is within the same county, you should update your voter information with your county clerk’s office prior to the election. If you have not done so, you will be required to update your information at your polling place before voting.

Moving Between Counties

If you have moved addresses and your new address is in a different county, you will need to re-register at your polling place before voting.

Military and other overseas citizens may use the standard procedure for absentee voting by mail, but there are also special provisions for members of the U.S. Armed Forces and merchant marine, commissioned corps of the Public Health Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with family members of all these groups, and other citizens who reside outside the United States (together these groups are called UOCAVA voters).

Registering and Requesting an Absentee Ballot

UOCAVA voters can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA) to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Wyoming Secretary of State’s Military/Overseas Citizens Voting webpage.

The Wyoming Voter Registration Form may also be used to register and will allow the voter to remain a permanent registered voter in Wyoming.

Receiving an Absentee Ballot

No formal absentee ballot request form is required for citizens who are registered voters in Wyoming. If you are unsure if you are still a registered voter in Wyoming, please contact your County Clerk. A voter may request an absentee ballot by contacting the County Clerk by phone, email, fax or mail. An Absentee Ballot Request Form has been created by the state if anyone wishes to use it. The form may be completed and emailed to the county clerk of the appropriate county.

Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot

The Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB) is a back-up ballot that can be used by UOCAVA voters.  You can use this FWAB whether you are located inside or outside the United States (including APO and FPO addresses), provided that you are away from your voting residence for service-related activities.  You must apply for a regular ballot early enough for your local election officials to receive the request at least 14 days before the election.  If you do not receive your regular ballot in time, you may use the FWAB.  Your FWAB must be received by your local voting officials in Wyoming no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day.  For specific instructions, visit the FVAP’s Wyoming-specific FVAP page

Wyoming residents with a felony conviction are not eligible to vote unless they have had their civil or voting rights restored. The Department of Corrections will restore voting rights to a non-violent felon if that person has not been convicted of any other felonies (other than convictions arising out of the same occurrence), has completed all of their sentence (including probation or parole), and it has been at least 5 years since the expiration of all terms of sentence or probation periods. Voting rights may also be restored at the discretion of the governor following a written application provided that the applicant’s term of sentence or probation has been completed. More information on voting rights restoration can be found on the Wyoming Secretary of State’s website.


Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, find a National Disability Rights Network partner in your area.

For more information for student voters, visit the Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the voting rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

More Info On Student Voting

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2016 Election Information for your state