Utah Elections

Get all the info you need

Your State

Not your state? Change state in dropdown.

Upcoming Elections

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Elections website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Voting Rights

News

Will you have the right to vote in 2016?
02/07/16 |
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 17:15
Excerpt: 

The nationwide push to make it harder to vote began in earnest after the 2010 election, when Republicans gained control of an unprecedented number of states. Their goal was to make the electorate older, whiter and more conservative compared with the younger and more diverse electorate that turned out in record numbers for Barack Obama in 2008.

Although the connection isn't obvious to everyone, these voting restrictions disproportionately affect the core of Obama's political coalition, including young people (some states exclude student IDs from the list of acceptable documents) and minority voters (who are more likely to vote early and less likely than whites to have state-issued IDs). A new study by political scientists at UC San Diego found that “a strict ID law could be expected to depress Latino turnout by 9.3 points, Black turnout by 8.6 points, and Asian American turnout by 12.5 points.” ...

[I]t's not just former Confederate states that have moved to gum up the democratic process. New Hampshire, which will hold its primary on Tuesday, has a new voter ID law on the books. Those without the required ID can still cast a regular ballot by signing an affidavit, but they will have to let poll workers take their pictures, which could lead to voter intimidation and longer lines at the polls. Wait times increased by 50% when the voter ID law was partially implemented, without the camera requirement, during the 2012 election.

Federal official requires citizenship proof for voter registration in 3 states
02/05/16 |
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 00:00
Excerpt: 

A federal elections official has decided – without public notice or review from his agency’s commissioners – that residents of Alabama, Kansas and Georgia can no longer register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of U.S. citizenship. ...

Under the new rule, any resident in those states who registers to vote using the federal form must show citizenship documentation – such as a birth certificate, naturalization papers or passport. In other states, no such documentation is needed to register; voters need only sign a sworn statement. ...

Kansas already had moved ahead with a dual voter-registration system, banning those who registered through the federal form from voting in state and local races. A state court recently ruled Kobach did not have the legislative authority to create such a dual system, but Kobach said Thursday that it’s now a moot point.

Alabama was waiting for EAC guidance to implement a proof-of-citizenship requirement because of questions of authority, state Elections Director Ed Packard said Thursday. He noted that it’s unclear how soon the new rule will be implemented, or what effect it might have.  ...

Georgia hasn’t implemented proof-of-citizenship requirements, and has put no restrictions on voters who register through federal forms, said David Dove, a spokesman for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

Here Are The Candidates

Election Reminders

Don't miss any important deadlines.

You Rock!

We'll be in touch and see you at the polls!

OR TEXT "ROCK" TO 788683

Msg & Data Rates May Apply. Text STOP to opt out or HELP for help. Expect 1 to 2 msgs/mo. Privacy Policy

Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

Learn More

Helpful Election Information

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 Presidential Preference Primary: Tuesday, March 22

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Utah Lieutenant Governor’s Elections website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

On Election Day, polls are open from 7:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Early in-person voting period  may vary based on the county. Please check with your County Clerk’s office to confirm the times and locations for early in-person voting in your county.

 

How to Find Your Polling Place

Call 1-866-OUR-VOTE!

Find your polling place and look at your sample ballot online.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Registration Deadlines

Voter registration forms must be postmarked at least 30 days before an election in order to be eligible to vote in the upcoming election.

You may register in-person at your County Clerk's Office up to 8 days before the election. You may register online up to 7 days before the election. You will not be eligible to participate in early voting, but you will be able to vote on election day.

In order to be eligible to participate in early voting, you must be registered to vote 30 days or more prior to the election.

NOTE: Beginning in 2014, some counties in Utah will implement an Election Day Registration pilot program.  If you live in a county that is participating in the pilot program, you can visit your polling place in-person, register to vote and cast a provisional ballot on Election Day.  For more information, contact your County Clerk’s office.

How to Check if You Are Registered

Call 1-866-OUR-VOTE!

You can check your voter information through the My Voter Profile on the Lieutenant Governor’s website.  You can also check your registration by contacting your County Clerk's Office.  You can find your County Clerk's Office here.

How to Register

Online

You can register to vote online through the Online Voter Registration system.  You must have a current Utah driver’s license or ID card in order to register using the online system.  You can also use the voter registration website to change the name or address on your voter registration record or change your party affiliation.

Your Online Voter Registration must be submitted 7 days or more prior to the upcoming election to be eligible to vote in-person at a polling place on Election Day in that election.  However, you will not be eligible for Early Voting unless you register to vote 30 days or more prior to that election.

In-Person or by Mail

You may register to vote in-person at your County Clerk’s office.  If you register in-person at your County Clerk’s office, you must register 8 days or more prior to the upcoming election to be eligible to vote in-person at a polling place on Election Day in that election.  You may also register in-person at the Drivers License Division, Division of Workforce Services, Utah State Department of Health, WIC Offices, Division of Services for People with Disabilities, Department of Rehabilitation, and at Utah public colleges and universities.  If you register at these locations, you must register 30 days or more prior to the upcoming election to be eligible to vote in that election.

You may also download a voter registration form here and mail the completed form to your County Clerk’s office.  If you choose to register by mail, the registration form must be postmarked 30 days or more prior to the upcoming election to be eligible to vote in that election.

Registration Eligibility

You are eligible to register to vote in Utah if you:

  • Are a citizen of the United States;
  • Have been a resident of Utah for at least 30 days immediately before the election;
  • Will be at least 18 years old on the day of the election,=;
  • Currently reside within the voting district or precinct in which you are applying to register to vote; and
  • Have not been convicted of a felony or an election-related misdemeanor (or have had your rights restored).

Identification Required for Registration

If you register in-person or by mail, you must provide the last four digits of your social security number and your Utah driver's license or state identification number.  If you register online, you must have a current Utah driver’s license or state ID card.

If You Want to Vote Early

If you are registered to vote at least 30 days prior to the election, you may participate in early voting in the counties where in-person early voting is offered. Contact your County Clerk’s office or check online for information about the early voting hours and locations in your county.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

Anyone who is registered to vote in Utah may vote by absentee ballot.  For absentee voting in the general election, an application must be filed by mail or in-person in the office of your County Clerk.  You must file an absentee ballot application for each election in which you would like to vote by absentee ballot, unless you become a permanent absentee voter.  To become a permanent absentee voter, you must check “Yes” in the permanent absentee section of the application.  All completed absentee ballot application forms should be filed with your County Clerk’s office no later than the Thursday before Election Day.  If you are required to show identification, but do not have the Valid ID at the time you make an application for an absentee ballot, you will be issued a provisional ballot that will include instructions for submitting a copy of a valid ID when you return your ballot.

If you are hospitalized or otherwise confined to a medical or long-term care institution (“a hospitalized voter”) after the absentee ballot application deadline, you may have another person request an absentee ballot application and absentee ballot on your behalf in-person at your County Clerk’s office.  The County Clerk’s office will require that person to sign a statement which includes his or her identity and the identity of the “hospitalized voter.”  To vote, the “hospitalized voter” is required to complete the absentee ballot application, complete and sign the absentee ballot envelope, mark their votes on the absentee ballot, place the absentee ballot into the envelope, and seal the envelope.  In order to be counted, the “hospitalized voter” must make sure that the absentee voter application and the sealed absentee ballot envelope are returned to the County Clerk’s office before the polls close on Election Day.

Procedures for Voting by Absentee Ballot

In-Person: You can file an application for an absentee ballot in-person at your County Clerk’s office by no later than the Thursday preceding Election Day.  If you file your application in-person, you can vote your absentee ballot at the County Clerk’s office at that time.  If you choose to cast your absentee ballot in-person at the County Clerk’s office, you must do so no later than the Thursday before Election Day.  You may also choose to submit your absentee ballot in-person at the proper polling place for your residence on Election Day.

By Mail: You can file an absentee ballot application online here or by mailing the application form to your County Clerk’s office.  You can download the application form here.  You will receive your ballot by mail as early as 28 days before the election.  You can return your ballot by mail or in-person.  If mailed, your ballot must be clearly postmarked before Election Day and received at your County Clerk’s office before noon on the fourth Monday in November.  

If you requested an absentee ballot but have not yet received your ballot, contact your County Clerk’s office.  Some counties also provide an online tool to check the status of your ballot.

You must sign the oath on the envelope used to return the absentee ballot.  No one else can sign the oath for you.  Be sure to carefully follow the instructions on your absentee ballot.  If you cannot sign the oath on your absentee ballot envelope because of a physical disability or illiteracy, contact your County Clerk’s office for assistance.

Voting In-Person on Election Day after Requesting an Absentee Ballot

If you requested an absentee ballot, you can vote a regular ballot at your polling place on Election Day if you submit your incomplete absentee ballot at your polling location and request that the ballot be declared spoiled.  You also have the option of submitting your completed absentee ballot to vote in-person at your polling place on Election Day.

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote

You must provide the last four digits of your social security number and your Utah driver's license or state identification number in order to register to vote in-person at your County Clerk’s office.  If you register online, you must have a current Utah driver’s license or state ID card.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

You must have a valid voter ID in order to vote in Utah.  This is either: one (1) of the forms of identification described below that bears the name and photograph of the voter; or two (2) forms of identification described below that bear the voter’s name and provides evidence that the voter resides in the precinct where the voter intends to cast a ballot.

In Utah, a voter may show one (1) of these forms of identification:

  • A currently valid Utah driver's license;
  • A currently valid ID card issued by the state or a branch, department, or agency of the U.S.;
  • A currently valid Utah permit to carry a concealed weapon;
  • A valid U.S. passport; or
  • A valid Tribal Identification Card, whether or not the card includes a photograph of the voter.

Or

       TWO forms of identification that bears the name of the voter and provides evidence that the voter resides in the voting precinct, which may include:

  • A current utility bill or legible copy (dated within 90 before the election);
  • A bank or other financial account statement, or legible copy;
  • A certified birth certificate;
  • A valid Social Security card;
  • A check issued by the state or federal government, or legible copy;
  • A paycheck from your employer, or a legible copy;
  • A currently valid Utah hunting or fishing license;
  • A currently valid U.S. military ID card;
  • Certified naturalization documentation (does NOT include a green card);
  • A certified copy of court records showing your adoption or name change;
  • A Bureau of Indian Affairs card;
  • A tribal treaty card;
  • A valid Medicaid, Medicare, or Electronic Benefits Transfer card;
  • A currently valid identification card issued by a local government within Utah;
  • A currently valid identification card issued by an employer;
  • A currently valid identification card issued by a college, university, technical school, or professional school within Utah; and/or
  • A current Utah vehicle registration.

If you do not present proper identification at the polls, you may be required to vote using a provisional ballot.  In order for your vote to count, you will have until the close of normal office hours on the Monday after the day of the election to present valid voter identification:

(A) To the county clerk at the county clerk's office; or

(B) To an election officer who is administering the election.

You may check the status of your provisional ballot online.

Moving Within Your Precinct: You can use the Mail-in Voter Registration Form or the Online Voter Registration system to update your voting information.  If you do not file a change of address, you will be permitted to vote a regular ballot by affirming the change of address at your polling place.

Moving Within Your County: You can use the Mail-in Voter Registration Form or the Online Voter Registration system to update your voting information.  If the registration deadline has passed, you can contact your County Clerk’s office by 5pm the Friday before the election to have your information updated on the registration list.  If your registration address is not updated on Election Day, you will be able to cast a provisional ballot at the polling place for your new address.  In order for a provisional ballot to count as a vote, you must show photo identification and proof of your current residence.  If the poll worker can verify that you are registered and you are voting at the correct new precinct, your vote will count.

Moving to a Different County: You can use the Mail-in Voter Registration Form or the Online Voter Registration system to update your voting information.  If your registration address is not up-to-date on Election Day, you will be able to cast a provisional ballot at the polling place for your new address.  In order for a provisional ballot to count as a vote, you must show photo identification and proof of your current residence.  If the poll worker can verify that you are registered and you are voting at the correct new precinct, your vote will count.

Completed military/overseas ballots must be received by the elections officer not later than the close of the polls on Election Day.  If received after the polls close, the ballot must have been submitted for mailing or electronic transmission not later than 12:01 a.m. at the place where the voter completes the ballot, on the date of the election.

Some counties in Utah are participating in an online ballot-marking pilot program. For more information, visit the Lieutenant Governor’s Military and Overseas Voters page or the Online Ballot Marking Program.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), also known as Standard Form 76, to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Utah-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can send and receive voting materials by fax and email.  If you wish to use the fax or email options, you must indicate this on your FPCA.  Instructions for doing so are found on the FVAP's Utah-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they are concerned about receiving their printed ballot and returning it by the 7:00 p.m., Election Day deadline.  The FWAB is a blank ballot on which voters write-in their choices.  The FWAB may also be used to register to vote and to apply for the absentee ballot, all in one step.  If the FWAB is being used to register to vote, it must be received by the voter registration deadline.  For specific instructions, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's Utah-specific FWAB page.

If you have been convicted of any felony, your right to register to vote and to vote is restored when you are sentenced to probation, granted parole, or have successfully completed the term of incarceration to which you were sentenced.  If you have been convicted of a misdemeanor violation of the Utah Election Code, your right to register to vote and to vote in an election is restored when you are sentenced to probation or have successfully completed the term of incarceration to which you were sentenced.

For more information click here to read the Utah State Election Code.

**The materials below have not been updated since 2014**

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, visit the National Disability Rights Network’s voting resource center.

For more information for student voters, visit the Utah Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights