Nevada Elections

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Upcoming Elections

2016 Presidential Preference Caucus: Saturday, February 20 (Democrats)

                                                      Tuesday, February 23 (Republicans)

Please note caucuses have specific rules. Contact your state party for more information.

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Nevada Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Voting Rights

News

Federal official requires citizenship proof for voter registration in 3 states
02/05/16 |
Publication Date: 
Friday, February 5, 2016 - 00:00
Excerpt: 

A federal elections official has decided – without public notice or review from his agency’s commissioners – that residents of Alabama, Kansas and Georgia can no longer register to vote using a federal form without providing proof of U.S. citizenship. ...

Under the new rule, any resident in those states who registers to vote using the federal form must show citizenship documentation – such as a birth certificate, naturalization papers or passport. In other states, no such documentation is needed to register; voters need only sign a sworn statement. ...

Kansas already had moved ahead with a dual voter-registration system, banning those who registered through the federal form from voting in state and local races. A state court recently ruled Kobach did not have the legislative authority to create such a dual system, but Kobach said Thursday that it’s now a moot point.

Alabama was waiting for EAC guidance to implement a proof-of-citizenship requirement because of questions of authority, state Elections Director Ed Packard said Thursday. He noted that it’s unclear how soon the new rule will be implemented, or what effect it might have.  ...

Georgia hasn’t implemented proof-of-citizenship requirements, and has put no restrictions on voters who register through federal forms, said David Dove, a spokesman for Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp.

New evidence that voter ID laws ‘skew democracy’ in favor of white Republicans
02/05/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, February 4, 2016 - 11:30
Excerpt: 

Voter fraud is, for all intents and purposes, practically nonexistent. The best available research on the topic, by Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt, found only 31 credible incidents of voter impersonation in an investigation of over 1 billion votes cast.

But that hasn't dampened Republican efforts to pass a spate of strict voter ID laws since 2008. And it hasn't hurt the public's overall enthusiasm for those laws, either.

But the results of a new working paper from political scientists at University of California, San Diego suggest folks may want to consider. The researchers analyzed turnout in recent elections -- between 2008 and 2012 -- in states that did and did not implement the strictest form of voter ID laws. They found that these laws consistently and significantly decreased turnout not just among traditionally Democratic-leaning groups, like blacks and Hispanics, but among Republican voters too.

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Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

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Helpful Election Information

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 Presidential Preference Caucus: Saturday, February 20 (Democrats)

                                                      Tuesday, February 23 (Republicans)

Please note caucuses have specific rules. Contact your state party for more information.

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

For more information, visit the Nevada Secretary of State website.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.

Polling Hours

7am to 7pm Election Day

Early Voting

All registered voters can early vote for the  Election between the third Saturday before the election and the Friday prior to Election Day at his or her County Clerk's Office or at temporary polling places to be established by the County Clerk

How to Find Your Polling Place

The Secretary of State provides an online polling place lookup tool.

Sample ballots are mailed to all registered voters.  The sample ballot includes sites where early voting will be held and where one's polling place is on Election Day.

The County Clerk/Registrar of Voters' office also have this information and can verify voter registration if you do not receive a sample ballot.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Registration Deadlines

The regitration deadline is 21 days prior to the election.

How to Check if You Are Registered

To check if you are already registered to vote, you can enter your information here.

How to Register
 
You may now register to vote and update your voter registration information online, including changing your address or party affiliation.  A DMV-issued ID is required. To register to vote online, click here.

Other Options for Registering to Vote

You can print and fill out this form.  After you sign it, you can mail it or deliver in person to the county clerk or registrar in your county. Note that the deadline is different depending on how you submit the form.

You may register to vote at other locations, including any Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles office, some college campuses, or various social service agencies. 

Registration Eligibility

You can register to vote in Nevada if you meet the following requirements:

  • You are a U.S. Citizen;
  • You will be 18 or older on Election Day (you can register at 17);
  • You have been a resident of Nevada for 30 days;
  • You do not have another permanent residence outside of Nevada;
  • You do not have a court declaration that says you have been deemed mentally incompetent to vote; and
  • You have not been convicted of certain felonies (unless you have had your rights restored).

Identification Required for Registration

You should show ID when you register to vote.  If you do not show ID when you register, you must show ID when you vote for the first time.  Acceptable forms of ID include: a voter registration card; a Nevada drivers license or state identification card; a military identification card; any other form of government issued identification card; a current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck; or any other form of government document with the individual's name and address.

When you register, you also have the option of including your driver's license number or at least the last four digits of your social security number on your application to register to vote.  If a state or local election official is able to connect that information with an existing identification record bearing the same number, name and date of birth as you have provided in your application, you will not have to present any additional forms of identification to the Board of Elections.

If You Want to Vote Early

All registered voters may vote early in person betweenthe third Saturday before the election and the Friday prior to Election Day at his or her County Clerk's Office or at temporary polling places to be established by the County Clerk.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

Any registered voter may request to vote by mail. To request an absentee ballot, you must complete and submit an absentee ballot request form which should be sent to your County Clerk’s Office.

You must request to vote by absentee and your form must be received by your local county election official no later than 5 p.m. on the seventh calendar day preceding an election.

All absentee ballots must be received by 7 p.m. on Election Day in order to be counted.

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote

You should show ID when you register to vote, but you are not required to.  If you do not show ID when you register, you must show ID when you vote for the first time.  Acceptable forms of ID include: a voter registration card; a Nevada Driver’s license or state identification card; a military identification card; any other form of government issued identification card; a current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck; or any other form of government document with the individual's name and address.

When you register, you also have the option of including your Nevada driver's license number, Nevada DMV ID card number, or the last four digits of your social security number on your application to register to vote.  If a state or local election official is able to connect that information with an existing identification record bearing the same number, name and date of birth as you have provided in your application, you will not have to present any additional forms of identification to the Board of Elections.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

If you did not show ID when you registered to vote and the driver’s license number you provided could not be matched to the DMV database, you must show ID when you vote for the first time.  Acceptable forms of ID include: a voter registration card; a Nevada Driver’s license or state identification card; a military identification card; any other form of government issued identification card; a current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck; or any other form of government document with the individual's name and address. 

All other voters need not show ID--your signature match is the only pre-requisite to voting.   

If you are a first time voter, this means that if you registered to vote online and did not provide a driver’s license/state ID number (or that number couldn’t be confirmed with the DMV) or you did not show ID when you registered to vote using a paper form, you must present identification in person when you go to vote or include proof of identification and residency when you send in your absentee ballot.

You can find more information on the Secretary of State’s website.

You should re-register to vote when:

  • You move;
  • You change your name; and
  • You change political parties.

If you moved before the registration deadline of the election, and did not re-register, you will only be able to vote in the election if you moved within the same county or voting precinct.  If you moved within the same county or precinct, you have the right to vote in your old precinct. You may be asked to provide an oral or written affirmation of your new address.

To update your registration, you can do so here or you can print out the form and mail or deliver it to your county clerk. 

Registering to Vote

If you are a Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) voter and you are not already registered to vote in Nevada, you can register to vote and request an absentee ballot at the same time by filling out a Federal Post Card Application.  Additionally, you can always register to vote online but you will have to request an absentee ballot separately. 

Requesting an Absentee Ballot

If you have not filled out a FPCA form, you can request an Absentee Ballot Request Form and submit it to your local county clerk. 

Individuals with felony convictions who have not had their civil rights restored are not eligible to register and vote.  However, the right to vote is automatically restored for persons convicted of certain felonies who have been honorably discharged from prison, probation or parole, with certain exceptions related to the seriousness of the crime committed.

For more information, visit the Nevada Secretary of State website.

**The materials below have not been updated since 2014**

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, visit the National Disability Rights Network’s voting resource center.

For more information for student voters, visit the Nevada Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights