Nevada Elections

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‘Rigged’ or Not, Election Positions Trump to Shape Rules on How You Vote
12/02/16 |
Publication Date: 
Saturday, December 3, 2016 - 01:00
Excerpt: 

“The last time we had a national government that was as hostile to the protection of minority voting rights as we may have with this president was probably near the end of the first Reconstruction” after the Civil War, said Pamela S. Karlan, a Stanford University law professor, who was a deputy assistant attorney general under President Obama until 2015. ...

Several potentially decisive federal court rulings on voting rules and redistricting, most favoring voting-rights advocates, now appear bound for a Supreme Court whose ideological balance is in Mr. Trump’s hands. Enforcement of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a linchpin of some of those cases, will fall to a Justice Department whose likely attorney general, Senator Jeff Sessions, Republican of Alabama, is viewed with deep suspicion by civil rights advocates.

One Trump adviser, Kris Kobach, the Kansas secretary of state, is among the most aggressive national crusaders for voting restrictions.

Michigan legislature debating voter ID bill
12/02/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 16:45
Excerpt: 

Adding the new requirements would make Michigan’s voter identification rules among the strictest in the nation. Michigan would join Wisconsin, Kansas, Indiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia and Virginia as the only states that require voters to both sign an affidavit at the polls and then take the second step of proving their identity later.

Thirty-four states, including Michigan, request or require voters to show identification at the polls, though several states are engaged in lawsuits with civil rights groups and the federal government challenging their rules. ...

Michigan legislators have until December 15 to pass final bills before adjourning for the year.

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Nevada Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 General Election: November 8, 2016

Voter Registration Deadline: October 18, 2016 (October 8, 2016 if by mail)

For more information, visit the Nevada Secretary of State’s website.

Election Day:

On Election Day, polls open at 7:00 a.m. Pacific time and close at 7:00 p.m. Pacific time. Voters in line to vote by 7:00 must be allowed to cast a ballot.

Any registered voter may also vote early, at any location in his or her respective county where early voting is offered. Access to the locations and times for each county is available on the Secretary of State’s website. For the 2016 general election, early voting will run from October 22, 2016 to November 4, 2016.

How to Find Your Polling Place: Look up your polling place with the Secretary of State’s Voter Search tool. Click on the “Polling Location” tab and enter your information.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.


Registration Deadlines: Registration closes the third Tuesday before the election. For the 2016 general election, registration ends on October 18, 2016.

How to Check Your Registration: Use the Nevada Secretary of State’s Voter Search tool or call 1-866-OUR-VOTE.

Registration Eligibility: Voters must be at least 18 years of age on or before the election, and must have continuously resided in the Nevada county in which they plan to vote for at least 30 days preceding the election, and in the precinct in which they plan to vote for at least 10 days preceding the election.

A citizen of Nevada is not eligible to vote if he or she has been convicted of two separate felonies, a single category A felony, or a single category B felony involving force or violence that resulted in substantial bodily harm to the victim. A person convicted of any other felony is eligible to vote as soon as he or she receives an honorable discharge from parole, or has served his or her sentence and been released from prison, and has properly registered to vote.

How to Register: Voters with a valid Nevada driver’s license or DMV identification card may register to vote online: https://nvsos.gov/sosvoterservices/Registration/step1.aspx.

Any voter may mail a paper voting application to his or her county clerk’s office. Contact information for every county clerk’s office can be found on the Nevada Secretary of State’s website.

Voters may also register in person at any Nevada DMV office, at various social service agencies, on college campuses, or at their respective county clerk’s office.

Identification Required for Registration: Voters with a current and valid Nevada driver’s license or Nevada DMV identification card may use it to register online. By providing a driver’s license number, the voter will only have to present identification the first time he or she votes in person. (If one of these identification documents was submitted with the voting registration application, you won’t need to provide it at the polls.)

Voters without a Nevada driver’s license or DMV identification card must register to vote either in person or via mail. Acceptable forms of identification include:

  • Nevada driver’s license
  • Identification card issued by the Department of State
  • Identification card issued by a branch of the Armed Forces of the United States
  • Identification card issue by a sheriff of a Nevada county to an employee as a condition of employment
  • Student identification card from an accredited private school, college or university
  • United States passport
  • Insurance plan identification card which the county clerk determines, in his or her discretion, to be a reliable indication of the true name and identify of the person
  • Tribal identification card

If You Want to Vote Early

Any registered voter may also vote early, at any location in his or her respective county where early voting is offered:

Early voting locations and times for every county are available on the Secretary of State’s website. For the 2016 general election, early voting will run from October 22, 2016 to November 4, 2016.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

Any registered voter may request an absentee ballot. Absentee voters must complete an Absent Ballot Request Form and submit it to their county clerk/registrar’s office. Contact information for every county clerk is provided on the Secretary of State’s website. A request to vote by absent ballot must be received by a voter’s local county election official no later than 5:00 p.m. on the seventh calendar day preceding an election. For the 2016 general election, requests must be received by 5:00 on November 1, 2016.

If a voter has registered to vote by mail and has never voted at the polls in Nevada, he or she cannot vote by absentee ballot unless he or she:

  • Provided identification and proof of residence to the county clerk; or
  • Provided his or her driver’s license number or the last four digits of his or her Social Security Number upon registering to vote; or
  • Is in the military or overseas; or
  • Gets the Absent Ballot Request Form notarized; or
  • Requests an absentee ballot in person at the office of the county clerk/registrar.

Rules and Deadlines

Once a voter has received an absentee ballot, it must be completed and returned to the same county election official no later than 7:00 p.m. on Election Day. For the 2016 general election, absentee ballots must be received by 7:00 on November 8, 2016.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

A voter who registered to vote online or via mail must vote at the polls for the first federal election in which he or she votes, and must present identification on that occasion, unless he or she provided a Nevada driver’s license number or other proper identification in his or her application to register to vote.

After voting once in person, voters are not required to present identification at the polling place, unless their signature does not match the signature on their registration form. Upon arrival, voters will be asked to sign in, and that signature will be verified against the signature on the voter registration. If the signature does not match, the voter must be identified by:

  • Answering questions from the election board officer about personal data reported on the voter registration; or
  • Reporting other personal data which verifies their identity; or
  • Showing their driver’s license, DMV identification card, military identification card, or any other form of identification issued by a governmental agency which contains the voter’s signature and physical description or picture.

VoteRiders has created Nevada voter ID info cards in English and in Spanish.

Moving within the Same County

Voters who move within the same precinct should go to the appropriate polling place for their precinct. Upon arrival, the voter will be asked to update his or her registration. If the updated address is within the precinct, the voter must be permitted to vote.

Voters must reside in a specific precinct for 10 days before the election in order to vote in that election. Voters who move from one precinct to another precinct in the same county after registration closes for a particular election must be allowed to vote in the precinct where they previously resided.

Moving Between Counties

Voters must reside in a specific county for 30 days before an election in order to vote in that county. Voters who move from one county to another county in the same state after registration closes for a particular election must be allowed to vote in the precinct where the voter previously resided.

Military and other overseas citizens may use the standard procedure for absentee voting by mail, but there are also special provisions for members of the U.S. Armed Forces and merchant marine, commissioned corps of the Public Health Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with family members of all these groups, and other citizens who reside outside the United States (together these groups are called UOCAVA voters).

Registering and Requesting an Absentee Ballot

A Uniformed and Overseas Citizen Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA) voter who is not already registered in Nevada can both register and request an absent ballot by completing and sending a Federal Post Card Application form to his or her county clerk. Contact information for every Nevada county clerk can be found on the Nevada Secretary of State’s website.

45 days before an election with a federal contest on the ballot, UOCAVA voters may use Nevada’s Effective Absentee System for Elections (EASE). EASE is an online application that combines voter registration and electronic ballot delivery and marking. EASE forms can be accessed at https://www.NVEASE.gov, but the site will only become active 45 days before each federal election.

UOCAVA voters may also register to vote online through the traditional online voting tool. Voters who choose this method must request an absent ballot separately, at which time they will provide the county clerk their current overseas or military post address.

UOCAVA voters must reaffirm their eligibility every election cycle (biennially). To reaffirm eligibility, voters must resubmit a Federal Post Card Application form to their county clerk’s office. Applications submitted for a primary election also act as a request for subsequent federal elections during that election cycle, including the General Election.

Receiving an Absentee Ballot

Using NVEASE.gov to complete a Federal Post Card Application will automatically generate an absent ballot to mark and return.

Registering with a Federal Post Card Application via mail constitutes a request for an absent ballot which will be mailed to the voter.

If registered in Nevada other than through a Federal Post Card Application (if a voter registered while residing in Nevada), a voter contact his or her county clerk’s office to request a ballot. Contact information for every office can be found on the Secretary of State’s website.

Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot

The Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB) is a back-up ballot that can be used by UOCAVA voters.  You can use this FWAB whether you are located inside or outside the United States (including APO and FPO addresses), provided that you are away from your voting residence for service-related activities.  You must apply for a regular ballot early enough for your local election officials to receive the request at least 5 days before the election.  If you do not receive your regular ballot in time, you may use the FWAB.  Your FWAB must be received by your local voting officials in Nevada no later than noon on Election Day.  For specific instructions, visit the FVAP's Nevada-specific FWAB page

In Nevada, rights-restoration depends on the kind of felony conviction, and the date and manner in which the sentence was completed. People with misdemeanor convictions do NOT lose the right to vote.

If a person was convicted of any kind of felony (violent or non-violent) and completed his/her sentence before July, 2003, his/her voting rights should have been automatically restored upon successful completion of parole or upon request for restoration. In order to vote, s/he must still re-register.

If a person was convicted of a felony after July, 2003, or completed his/her sentence after this date, it depends on the kind of felony. If he or she has been convicted of two separate felonies, a single category A felony, or a single category B felony involving force or violence that resulted in substantial bodily harm to the victim, he or she is not eligible to vote. A person convicted of any other felony is eligible to vote as soon as he or she receives an honorable discharge from parole, or has served his or her sentence and been released from prison, and has properly registered to vote.

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, find a National Disability Rights Network partner in your area.

For more information for student voters, visit the Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the voting rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

More Info On Student Voting

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2016 Election Information for your state