Illinois Elections

Get all the info you need

Your State

Voting Rights

News

RSS Feed unavailable
Michigan legislature debating voter ID bill
12/02/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, December 1, 2016 - 16:45
Excerpt: 

Adding the new requirements would make Michigan’s voter identification rules among the strictest in the nation. Michigan would join Wisconsin, Kansas, Indiana, Tennessee, Mississippi, Georgia and Virginia as the only states that require voters to both sign an affidavit at the polls and then take the second step of proving their identity later.

Thirty-four states, including Michigan, request or require voters to show identification at the polls, though several states are engaged in lawsuits with civil rights groups and the federal government challenging their rules. ...

Michigan legislators have until December 15 to pass final bills before adjourning for the year.

More Info About Your Candidates

Here is what your ballot will cover on Election Day.

Get informed and prepared to make your voice heard.

Review national and local voter guides on PollVault to get more informed.

Illinois Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 General Election: November 8, 2016

Voter Registration Deadline: Voters can register before and even on Election Day.

Election Day Polling Place Hours

6 a.m. - 7 p.m.

Early Voting

Any voter in Illinois can vote early, although dates, times, and locations of early voting depend on where you live.  Early voting begins as early as September 29 (though most early voting locations will not be open until October 24) and ends as late as November 7.  

In Chicago, the Chicago Board of Election Commissioners provides details here: http://www.chicagoelections.com/en/early-voting.html

If you are outside Chicago, contact your County or Local Elections Official for information about location and times, or visit the State Board of Election website for more details.

Use this Illinois online polling place lookup tool

If you live in Chicago, check http://www.chicagoelections.com/info

You can also Google “find my polling place”.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.


Registration Deadlines:

Illinois voters may register to vote before or even on Election Day.  But the procedures differ depending on when you are registering.  Election Day Registration (EDR) is available in at least one place in every county.  In Chicago, Cook County, and several other places[1], you can take advantage of EDR at every polling place.  In some lower population areas, EDR might only be available at one location per county, which is typically the county courthouse.  Voters can also register by mail or in person on certain dates before the election through “grace period” registration, but then the voter must vote at a designated “grace period” voting site.   If you have questions about registration, call 866-OUR-VOTE.

How to Check Your Registration:

Use this online registration lookup tool.

Registration Eligibility:

In order to register to vote in Illinois, you MUST be a U.S. citizen and at least 18 years old by Election Day. 

How to Register:

In Chicago, Cook County, and several other places[2], you can register at your polling place on Election Day.  All Illinois residents can register online, in person (at the office of the election authority, at driver's license facilities, or with deputy registrars in each area), or via mail using the Illinois Voter Registration Application available in English and Spanish.  In Cook County and the City of Chicago, registration forms are also available online and in person in Chinese, Hindi, Polish, and Korean. 

Identification Required for Registration:

If you register in person, you must bring two forms of identification, including at least one showing the current address (or, if the voter is homeless, their mailing address).  Acceptable forms of ID include but are not limited to: driver's license, social security card, public aid identification card (such as Illinois Link card), utility bill, employee or student identification card, credit card, or a civic, union, or professional association membership card.

If you are registering by mail on an Illinois state voter registration application, you are required to provide your driver's license number or state identification card number.  If you do not have either of those, you are required to submit the last 4 digits of your social security number.  If you do not have any of the above, then you should include with your mailed voter registration form a copy of a current and valid photo identification, or a copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check, or other government document that shows your name and address.  You may also provide a photo identification issued by a college or university along with either a copy of the applicant's contract or lease for a residence, or any postmarked mail delivered to you at your current address.



[1] List of Counties offering EDR in all polling places: Champaign, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Lake, La Salle, Macon, Madison, McHenry, McLean, Peoria, Rock Island, Sangamon, Stark, St. Clair, Tazewell, Will, and Winnebago Counties.  Information about where to find EDR will also be posted to votingrightsillinois.org.

[2] List of Counties offering EDR in all polling places: Champaign, Cook, DeKalb, DuPage, Grundy, Kane, Kankakee, Kendall, Lake, La Salle, Macon, Madison, McHenry, McLean, Peoria, Rock Island, Sangamon, Stark, St. Clair, Tazewell, Will, and Winnebago Counties.

If You Want to Vote Early

Early Voting: Registered voters may go in person to their local board of elections office (or other locations announced by the election board).  At some voting sites, the period for early voting begins as early as September 29, 2016, although many early voting sites will not open until October 24, 2016. Early voting sites remains open as late as November 7, 2016.  You can look up the locations and times of early voting polling places on the State Board of Elections website at: https://www.elections.il.gov/votinginformation/earlyvotinglocations.aspx.

Although a government-issued photo ID is not required, if you have one, it may be useful to bring one to avoid confusion.  Early voting might be more convenient for some voters and could be less likely to have long lines.

If You Want to Vote by Mail (Absentee)

Any registered Illinois voter can request a mail-in (formerly called absentee) ballot.  You do not need to provide any special excuse.  Voters can obtain a mail-in ballot application on the State Board of Elections website (http://www.elections.il.gov/VotingInformation/VotingByMail.aspx), the State Board of Elections office, or at your local board of election office.  For the 2016 general election, the mail-in ballot request must be received by your local election board’s office by November 3, 2016, if you send it by mail. If you hand-deliver it, you must hand-deliver it by November 7, 2016.  You can mail, e-mail, fax, or deliver in person your completed mail-in ballot request to your local election board’s office.

Mailed ballots must be received by the election board or at least postmarked by Election Day.  To make sure that your ballot will be counted, have the local post office put a postmark date on the return envelope.

In general, Illinois voters do not have to provide ID at the polling place in order to vote.  There are exceptions to this:

  • Voters using Election Day Registration (EDR) or a first-time voter who registered by mail but did not submit sufficient proof of identity with the registration application must present ID.  These voters must bring two of the following IDs, with one of them containing the person’s current address:
     
    • Illinois driver’s license or state ID card;
    • Employee or student ID;
    • Credit card;
    • Social Security card;
    • Birth certificate;
    • Utility bill in the voter’s name;
    • Mail postmarked to the voter;
    • Valid U.S. passport;
    • Public assistance ID card (such as Illinois Link card); or
    • Lease or rental contract.

  • If a voter’s qualifications are challenged, the voter may be required to produce two forms of identification showing her current residence address, including one piece of mail addressed to the voter at her current residence address and postmarked on October 10, 2016 or later.  Otherwise, voters may bring a witness who is registered to vote in that same precinct and who is willing to take an oath and say that the voter is qualified to vote there—and then the voter may vote.
  • Some places may require that the voter present two forms of ID if she is on the inactive voter list.

If a voter is unable to show identification when required—if the voter registered by mail without providing identification, was successfully challenged, is on the inactive list, or is using Election Day Registration (EDR)—the voter is allowed to vote by provisional ballot.  BUT a voter should try to go back and get an ID before entering the polls, instead of voting with a provisional ballot, because provisional ballots are not always counted.

VoteRiders has created Illinois voter ID info cards in English and in Spanish.

The below chart can help you determine how to correct your registration if you have moved.

 

Moved within the same precinct

Moved to a different precinct but within the same election area

Moved to a different election area within Illinois

Moved within 30 days of Election Day

If moved within 27 days of the election: The voter should go to their polling place (both addresses should vote at the same place) and cast a regular full ballot after completing an affidavit listing the voter’s former and current addresses.

The voter may use grace period or Election Day registration to update their info and vote on the same day at the polling place for their current address (in Chicago, Cook County, and certain other places) or another location such as the local election board office

 

Or if that isn’t feasible, the voter can complete an address correction form at the precinct for their old address and cast a regular full ballot for that old address.

The voter may use grace period or Election Day registration to update their info and vote on the same day at the polling place for their current address (in Chicago, Cook County, and certain other places) or another location such as the local election board office.

Or if that isn’t feasible, the voter can complete an address correction form at the precinct for their old address and cast a full ballot for that old address.

Moved more than 30 days before Election Day

The voter may use grace period or Election Day registration to update their info and vote on the same day at the polling place for their current address (in Chicago, Cook County, and certain other places) or another location such as the local election board office.

 

Or if that isn’t feasible, the voter can complete an address correction form at the precinct for their old address and cast a ballot for only federal offices.

The voter may use grace period or Election Day registration to update their info and vote on the same day at the polling place for their current address (in Chicago, Cook County, and certain other places) or another location such as the local election board office

 

Or if that isn’t feasible, the voter can complete an address correction form at the precinct for their old address and cast a ballot for only federal offices.

The voter may use grace period or Election Day registration to update their info and vote on the same day at the polling place for their current address (in Chicago, Cook County, and certain other places) or another location such as the local election board office

Military service members and US citizens living outside the US can register to vote, can request an absentee ballot, and can submit voting materials by mail, fax, or e-mail.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Illinois-specific page for step-by-step help and rules about deadlines and other requirements.

Most likely, you will be able to vote. The only people in Illinois who cannot vote because of their criminal record are people who:

  • Are in prison or jail serving a sentence because of being convicted of any crime;
  • Are on furlough from prison or jail; or
  • Are on work-release from prison or jail.

You should be able to register and vote if you completed your sentence for a felony crime, if you are on probation or parole, if you have been arrested or charged with a crime but have NOT been convicted, or if you are in jail before your trial.

If you have served your sentence and have been released, you are again eligible to vote. Check if you are registered here: http://ova.elections.il.gov/RegistrationLookup.aspx. You may need to register again. 

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, find a National Disability Rights Network partner in your area.

For more information for student voters, visit the Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the voting rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

More Info On Student Voting

Rock the Vote Reminders

Don't miss any important deadlines.

You Rock!

We'll be in touch and see you at the polls!

OR TEXT "ROCK" TO 788683

Msg & Data Rates May Apply. Text STOP to opt out or HELP for help. Expect 1 to 2 msgs/mo. Privacy Policy

2016 Election Information for your state