Hawaii Elections

Get all the info you need

Your State

Upcoming Elections

2016 Presidential Preference Caucus: March 8 for Republicans; March 26 for Democrats

  • There is NO voter registration deadline. Voters may register on Election Day at their caucus site.

Please note caucuses have specific rules. Contact your local state party for more information.

2016 Congressional/State Primary: August 13

  • Voter Registration Deadline: July 14

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

  • Voter Registration Deadline: October 10

For more information, visit the Hawaii Office of Elections site.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.



More state specific election info below.

Voting Rights

News

Analysis: A Texas Judge Takes Voter ID to Court
05/02/16 |
Publication Date: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 00:30
Excerpt: 

The only Democrat in elected statewide office in Texas is suing to upend the state’s photo voter ID law, saying it’s an unconstitutional obstacle to a legal activity: voting. ...

His challenge is the sort of technical thing you would expect from a long-time judge. He points to this sentence in the Texas Constitution...: “In all elections by the people, the vote shall be by ballot, and the Legislature shall provide for the numbering of tickets and make such other regulations as may be necessary to detect and punish fraud and preserve the purity of the ballot box; and the Legislature shall provide by law for the registration of all voters.”

“It does not include ‘prevent,’” he says, adding that the voter ID law is “a prior restraint against your constitutional right to vote.”

As he put it in his original filing, the voter ID law forces voters to prove they are innocent before they cast their ballots rather than requiring the state to prove that someone is actually guilty of voter fraud once they have voted. Someone who doesn’t have the required identification “will be denied his right to vote and will be presumed to be guilty of voter fraud,” he wrote.

Stricter Rules for Voter IDs Reshape Races
05/02/16 |
Publication Date: 
Monday, May 2, 2016 - 00:00
Excerpt: 

As the general election nears — in which new or strengthened voter ID laws will be in place in Texas and 14 other states for the first time in a presidential election — recent academic research indicates that the requirements restrict turnout and disproportionately affect voting by minorities. The laws are also, as in the case of [Texas Congressional candidate, Pete] Gallego, reshaping how many campaigns are run — with candidates not only spending time to secure votes, but also time to ensure those votes can be cast.

Thirty-three states now have ID laws, at least 17 of them — including Texas — requiring not just written proof of identity, but requiring or requesting a photograph as well.

Most research suggests that the laws result in few people being turned away at the polls. But a study of the Texas ID requirement by Rice University’s Baker Institute for Public Policy released in August found that many more qualified voters, confused or intimidated by the new rules, have not tried to vote at all. ...

A second study, by the University of California, San Diego, concluded in February that the strictest voter ID laws — those that require an identity card with a photograph — disproportionately affect minority voters.

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Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

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Hawaii Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 Presidential Preference Caucus: March 8 for Republicans; March 26 for Democrats

  • There is NO voter registration deadline. Voters may register on Election Day at their caucus site.

Please note caucuses have specific rules. Contact your local state party for more information.

2016 Congressional/State Primary: August 13

  • Voter Registration Deadline: July 14

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8

  • Voter Registration Deadline: October 10

For more information, visit the Hawaii Office of Elections site.

Please note that the information in the sections below has not been updated, and refers to the 2015 general election.


7:00am to 6:00pm on Election Day.  For more information about voting early/absentee, see below.

Use of Office of Elections Polling Place Locator tool.

Direct polling place questions to the appropriate City/County Clerk:

  • County of Hawaii 961-8277
  • County of Maui 270-7749
  • County of Kauai 241-4800
  • City & County of Honolulu 768-3800


REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.


Registration Deadlines

Hawaii requires voters to be registered by 4:30pm on the 30th day before an election.

How to Check if You Are Registered

Contact your County Elections Official:

  • County of Hawaii 961-8277
  • County of Maui 270-7749
  • County of Kauai 241-4800
  • City & County of Honolulu 768-3800

How to Register

Hawaii will now offer voter registration services online. To register online, visit the Online Voter Registration System.

To download a registration form, find your closest Office of Elections, and for more information on registration, visit the Office of Elections Voter Registration page.

Registration Eligibility

In order to vote, Hawaii law requires one must first register to vote at least 30 days prior to the election.  To be eligible to register in Hawaii you MUST:

  • be a citizen of the United States of America;
  • be a legal resident of Hawaii; and
  • be at least 18 years of age.

Identification Required for Registration

Hawaii law requires that a person registering to vote provide, under oath, his or her social security number, if any.  An application lacking this information will, therefore, be denied.

If you are registering to vote for the first time in the State of Hawaii, and are registering by mail, you are required to submit, along with your application proof of identification.  Proof of identification includes a copy of:

  • A current and valid photo identification, or
  • A current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document that shows your name and address.

If you do not provide the required proof of identification with the affidavit on Application for Voter Registration, you will be required to do so at your polling place, or with your voted absentee mail-in ballot.

If You Want to Vote Early

Early voting in Hawaii is by absentee voting-in-person.  Absentee polling sites are open approximately 10 working days prior to the election and close 2 working days before Election Day.

Please see the below information about how to vote absentee in person.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

Anyone registered to vote may vote by absentee ballot - by mail or in person.

Rules and Deadlines:

By Mail

You must submit an Application for Absentee Voter Ballot (also known as the Wikiwiki Absentee Application form) or write a letter to the City/County Clerk where you are registered to vote.  The letter must include the name under which you are registered to vote, your address as registered, your birth date, your Social Security Number, and your signature.  You must specify the elections in which you want to vote absentee and the address to which your absentee ballot should be mailed.

You must return your completed Application for Absentee Voter Ballot to your City/County Clerk no earlier than 60 days and no later than 7 days prior to the election.

You must return your voted Absentee Ballot to your City/County Clerk by the day of the respective election.

In person

You must vote at an absentee polling place established by the City/County Clerk where you are registered to vote.  You do not need to request an absentee ballot in advance in order to vote absentee in person.  You must bring proper identification.

Absentee walk-in polling places are located at the Offices of the City or County Clerk where you reside.  For additional locations and hours of operations, call your City/County Clerk where you reside.

For deadlines, see above section on Early Voting.

For more information, visit the Office of Elections Absentee Voting page.

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote

If you are registering to vote for the first time in the State of Hawaii, and are registering by mail, you are required to submit, along with your application proof of identification.  Proof of identification includes a copy of:

  • A current and valid photo identification, or
  • A current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document that shows your name and address.

If you do not provide the required proof of identification with the affidavit on Application for Voter Registration, you will be required to do so at your polling place, or with your voted absentee mail-in ballot.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

At the polls, you will be asked to provide a picture ID with a signature on it for verification of your identity.  If you do not have a photo ID, you may be asked to recite your date of birth and your address in order to corroborate the poll book entry.  If you are able to confirm this information, you should be permitted to vote a regular ballot, even without a photo ID.  You will be asked to sign the poll book to record that you voted at that polling place. 

Any registered voter, who changes residence from one precinct or county to another, shall notify the clerk and change the registration to the proper precinct or county by the appropriate registration deadline.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), also known as Standard Form 76, to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Hawaii-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can send and receive voting materials by fax and email.  If you wish to use the fax or email options, you must indicate this on your FPCA.  Instructions for doing so are found on the FVAP's Hawaii-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they are concerned with receiving their printed ballot and returning it by the 7:00 p.m., Election Day deadline.  The FWAB is a blank ballot on which voters write-in their choices.  The FWAB may also be used to register to vote and to apply for the absentee ballot, all in one step.  If the FWAB is being used to register to vote, it must be received by the voter registration deadline.  For specific instructions, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's Hawaii-specific FWAB page.

Convicted felons may not vote while currently incarcerated, but may register and vote after released from imprisonment, including while on probation or parole.

**The materials below have not yet been updated since 2014**

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, visit the National Disability Rights Network’s voting resource center

For more information for student voters, visit the Hawaii Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

2016 Election Information for your state