Florida Election Information

Get all the election and voter information you need below.

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Upcoming Elections in Your State

2014 General Election: November 4, 2014

For detailed election information, visit the Florida Division of Elections website.

Other Important Election Information

On Primary and General Election days, the polls are open from 7 AM to 7 PM.

All Floridians can vote early on the following dates:

2014 General Election: October 25, 2014-November 1, 2014

However, a number of counties offer additional days of early voting, so be sure to check the hours the early voting sites are open in your county, as each county Supervisor of Elections may offer additional days of early voting.

Registered voters can find their polling place using the State of Florida Voter Lookup tool.

Alternatively, you can call 1-866-OUR-VOTE or contact your Supervisor of Elections.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Registration Deadlines

2014 General Election: October 6, 2014

Voters must register at least 29 days before Election Day.

How to Check if you Are Registered

Check the Florida Division of Elections voter registration lookup page here

How to Register 

In-Person or by Mail

You may register to vote by mailing in your registration form, which you can download in English or Spanish.  Florida does not offer online voter registration, but you may type in most of your information on the form and then print it out, sign it and then mail it in.

Applicants can mail voter registration forms to their County Supervisor of Elections, whose address can be found on the voter registration form.  Contact information for County Supervisors of Elections can also be found here.  Mail-in applications must be processed by the deadline (29 days prior any specific election) to be eligible to vote in that election.  Because your registration form may take several days to be arrive and be processed, it is best to give yourself a few extra days by submitting your voter registration form ahead of the 29-day cutoff point.

Registration Eligibility 

In order to vote, Florida law requires one must first register to vote at least 29 days prior to the election.  To be eligible to register in Florida you MUST:

  • Be a United States citizen (not a lawful permanent resident);
  • Be a resident of Florida;
  • Be at least 18 years old (you can pre-register to vote if you are at least 16 years old, but you cannot vote until you are at least 18 years old);
  • Not now be deemed mentally incapacitated with respect to voting in Florida or any other state without first having the right to vote restored;
  • Not have been convicted of a felony without your civil rights having been restored; and
  • Provide your current and valid Florida Driver’s License number or Florida Identification Card number.  If you do not have either a Florida Driver’s License or Florida Identification Card, you must provide the last four digits of your Social Security number.  If you do not have any of these items, you must write “none” in the box or field.

There is no length of residency requirement in Florida in order to register to vote.  You can register at any time.

Identification Required for Registration

The Florida voter registration form requires that one must attach an ID to the application if you have never voted in Florida.  Everyone will be asked to provide a current and valid Florida Driver’s License number or else a Florida Identification Card number.  If you do not have either of these forms of identification, you will be asked to provide the last four digits of your Social Security Number.  If you do not have any of the above forms of identification, you may provide one of the following:

  • A copy of an ID that shows your name and photo, such as:
    • A U.S. Passport;
    • A debit or credit card;
    • A military ID;
    • A student ID;
    • A retirement center ID;
    • A neighborhood association ID; or
    • A public assistance ID;
  • Or else a copy of an ID that: shows your name and current residence address, such as:
    • A utility bill;
    • A bank statement;
    • A government check;
    • A paycheck; or
    • Another government document.
The following people do not need to provide a copy of one of the above listed IDs:
  • Those 65 or older;
  • Those who have a temporary or permanent physical disability; 
  • Those who are a member of the active uniformed services or merchant marine who are absent from the county for active duty, or are a spouse or dependent thereof; or 
  • Those who are currently living outside the U.S. but otherwise eligible to vote in Florida. 

If You Want to Vote Early

Florida has in-person early voting. Early voting begins no later than the 10th day before an election and ends on the 3rd day before the election, and is available for between 8 and 12 hours per day for each day during the early-voting period.  Early voting may be offered at the discretion of the County Supervisor of Elections on the 15th, 14th, 13th, 12th, 11th, or 2nd day before an election that contains state or federal races.  Early voting sites are designated 30 days prior to an election by the Supervisor of Election.  You can find more information on early voting dates, times and locations here.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

A person is qualified to vote by absentee ballot if he or she is unable or cannot go to the polls to vote during early voting or Election Day.  Note, however, that a person does not have to be absent from his or her county of residence or have another reason to vote absentee.

Procedures for Voting by Absentee Ballot

You must request an absentee ballot directly from the Supervisor of Elections by doing one of the following:

On-line 

Visit your County Supervisor of Elections' website--you can find a link at this website. Then navigate your way to the absentee ballot request page.

In Person

Visit your County Supervisor of Elections office, complete an application, and cast your ballot.  You may obtain an absentee ballot in-person at your County Supervisor of Elections office up through and including on Election Day.  However, if you want to receive your absentee ballot by mail, your request must be received by your County Supervisor of Elections by no later than 5 p.m. on the 6th day before an election (October 29, 2014).  Your ballot must be returned by no later than 7 p.m. on Election Day or it will not be counted.  Military members and their family, and overseas citizens can request an absentee ballot by federal postcard and absentee application (FPCA).

By Mail

You can request the application by calling, emailing, or mailing your County Supervisor of Elections office.  If applying by mail, the county voter registration office must receive the absentee ballot application no later than 5 p.m. on the 6th day before the election (October 29, 2014).  When an absentee ballot request is made, the following information must be provided:

  • The name of the voter for whom the ballot is being requested;
  • The voter’s address;
  • The voter’s date of birth; 
  • The voter’s signature (if the request is written); and
  • The address to which the ballot should be sent (if not the address at which the voter is registered to vote).

In addition, at your direct instruction, an immediate family member or legal guardian may make an absentee ballot request for you.  When someone other than yourself requests an absentee ballot for you, they will need to provide, in addition to the information above, the following information:

  • The requestor’s address;
  • The requestor’s driver’s license number (if available);
  • The requestor’s relationship to the voter; and
  • The requestor’s signature (if the request is written).

If you requested an absentee ballot but have not yet received your ballot, check the status of your absentee ballot online either at this link or through your County Supervisor of Election’s website.  If you still have questions, contact your Supervisor of Elections.

You can pick up your absentee ballot up to five days before an election or on Election Day itself.  You can also designate someone else to pick up the ballot for you at the Supervisor of Election’s office.  Your designee may only pick up 2 absentee ballots per election (other than his or her own ballot and ballots for members of his or her immediate family).  Your designee must submit a completed Affidavit to Pick-up an Absentee Ballot for a Voter which will include your written authorization.  If you did not already request a ballot, the Affidavit must be accompanied by your request.

Your ballot must be returned to your Supervisor of Election’s office by 7:00p.m. on Election Day (November 4, 2014).  Be sure to carefully follow the instructions on your absentee ballot, particularly those about where you must sign your name. You may return the ballot personally or by mail.  Other options are available for military members and their families who are absent from their county of residence due to active duty, and for overseas civilians; for more information on them, click here.

You must sign the absentee ballot, per the voting instructions contained with your ballot.  If you forget to sign the ballot, it will not be counted unless you complete and submit an Omitted Signature Affidavit for Absentee Ballot.  If you have a physical disability, you may receive assistance from anyone you choose to help you, so long as that person is not your employer, an agent of your employer, or an officer or agent of your union.

Voting in Person after Requesting an Absentee Ballot

If you requested an absentee ballot but then decide that you want to vote in person or are able to vote in person on Election Day, bring your absentee ballot with you to your polling station (whether or not it has been filled out).  If you do not bring your absentee ballot with you to your polling station, you will still be allowed to cast a regular ballot if the Supervisor of Election’s office can determine that it has not already received your absentee ballot.  If the Supervisor of Elections’ office confirms that you have already cast your absentee ballot, you will not be allowed to vote again in-person.  However, if you think that the Supervisor of Elections' office is mistaken and that you have not already cast your absentee ballot, or else if the Supervisor of Election’s office cannot determine whether or not you have already cast an absentee ballot, you will be allowed to cast a provisional ballot.

Identification Requirements to Register to Vote

The Florida voter registration form requires that one must attach an ID to the application if you have never voted in Florida.  Everyone will be asked to provide a current and valid Florida Driver’s License number or else a Florida Identification Card number.  If you do not have either of these forms of identification, you will be asked to provide the last four digits of your Social Security Number.  If you do not have any of the above forms of identification, you may provide one of the following:

  • A copy of an ID that shows your name and photo, such as:
    • A U.S. Passport;
    • A debit or credit card;
    • A military ID;
    • A student ID;
    • A retirement center ID;
    • A neighborhood association ID; or
    • A public assistance ID.
  • Or else a copy of an ID that shows your name and current residence address, such as:
    • A utility bill;
    • A bank statement;
    • A government check;
    • A paycheck; or
    • Another government document.
The following people do not need to provide a copy of one of the above listed IDs:
  • Those 65 or older;
  • Those who have a temporary or permanent physical disability; 
  • Those who are a member of the active uniformed services or merchant marine who are absent from the county for active duty, or are a spouse or dependent thereof; or 
  • Those who are currently living outside the U.S. but otherwise eligible to vote in Florida. 

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

A voter must provide a current and valid photo identification with a signature to vote at the polling place.  Acceptable forms of ID are:

  • Florida driver's license;
  • Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles;
  • United States passport;
  • Debit or credit card; 
  • Military identification;
  • Student identification;
  • Retirement center identification;
  • Neighborhood association identification; and
  • Public assistance identification.

If the picture identification does not contain a signature, you will be asked to provide an additional identification with your signature.

If you do not bring identification with you, you should not be turned away from the polls.  You are entitled to cast a provisional ballot.  Your provisional ballot will count if the signature on the provisional ballot envelope matches the signature the Supervisor of Elections has on file for you.

If you have moved within your state, you are still eligible to vote, but you must update your address before you can cast a ballot.  Your voter registration should always reflect your current residence address because you are only allowed to vote in the county of residence.

If you move within same county after you have registered to vote, you have the option of making the address change in person at your Supervisor of Elections’ office, by phone, by e-mail, by fax or by other written means (you will need to provide your date of birth).  If you have not notified the Supervisor of Elections ahead of the election, you can go to the correct polling place for your current address (which you can find by calling 1-866-OUR-VOTE), complete a form to change your address, and you must be permitted to vote a regular ballot.

If the address change is from one county to another, you can also make the change in the same way, but only if you make it directly to the Supervisor of Elections’ office for your new county of residence.  Otherwise, you have to use the Florida Voter Registration Application to change your out-of-county address and submit the application to your Supervisor of Elections.

If you do not update your address before you try to vote, you will be allowed to cast a provisional ballot.  You may cast a regular ballot only after making an address change at the polls and if the precinct at which you vote has an electronic poll book or if you are an active military personnel, provided you are in the precinct corresponding to your current legal residence and you are otherwise eligible to vote.

Special services are provided to assist military and overseas civilian voters participate in elections.  If you are a military or overseas civilian voter who is eligible to vote in Florida, you can find out more at the Florida Secretary of State's site here.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Post Card Application (FPCA), also known as Standard Form 76, to register to vote and to request an absentee ballot.  Visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's (FVAP) Florida-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can send and receive voting materials by fax and email.  If you wish to use the fax or email options, you must indicate this on your FPCA.  Instructions for doing so are found on the FVAP's Florida-specific FPCA page.

Military and overseas citizens can use the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot (FWAB) if they are concerned with receiving their printed ballot and returning it by the 7:00 p.m., Election Day deadline.  The FWAB is a blank ballot on which voters write-in their choices.  The FWAB may also be used to register to vote and to apply for the absentee ballot, all in one step.  If the FWAB is being used to register to vote, it must be received by the voter registration deadline.  For specific instructions, visit the Federal Voting Assistance Program's Florida page to download the form.

In Florida, persons who have been convicted of a felony permanently lose their right to vote.  However, such a person can have his or her voting rights restored through a pardon from the governor.  For more information, contact the Office of Executive Clemency.

FAQ

Electionary

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with mental disabilities, visit The Bazelon Center for Mental Health Law and National Disability Rights Network’s document: “Voting Rights Guide for People with Mental Disabilities.” 

For more information for student voters, visit the Florida Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights


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