Arkansas Elections

Get all the info you need

Your State

Voting Rights

News

Strict voter ID law approved in Michigan House
12/08/16 |
Publication Date: 
Thursday, December 8, 2016 - 01:00
Excerpt: 

Michigan’s Republican-led House on Wednesday night approved a strict voter identification proposal over strenuous objections from Democrats who argued the plan could disenfranchise properly registered voters.

Michigan voters without photo identification could still cast a provisional ballot under the controversial legislation, but they would have to bring an ID to their local clerk’s office within 10 days of an election in order for their vote to count. ...

The measure now heads to the Senate with just four full days left in the so-called lame-duck session.

Trump and Pence: this Pew report proves our voter fraud claims. Actual report: nope.
12/07/16 |
Publication Date: 
Wednesday, December 7, 2016 - 12:30
Excerpt: 

The report isn’t even about voter fraud; it’s about the technical aspects of voter registration systems, and how America could save money by upgrading how it registers voters. ...

There have been multiple investigations into voter fraud. None of them have found serious evidence of anything close to millions of people voting illegally.

One analysis focused just on voter impersonation, the type of fraud that strict voter ID laws (which Trump supports) aim to curtail. Tracking credible allegations of this type of fraud, Loyola Law School professor Justin Levitt found 35 total credible allegations between 2000 and 2014 [out of a total of 1 billion ballots cast]. ...

A 2012 investigation by the News21 journalism project looked at all kinds of voter fraud, including voter impersonation, people voting twice, vote buying, absentee fraud, and voter intimidation. It confirmed that voter impersonation was extremely rare, with just 10 credible cases. ...

Putting all of this together, the evidence is clear: Voter fraud is extremely rare. It doesn’t add up to the millions in one election, as Trump claimed. In fact, it doesn’t even add up to the thousands in a single election. So Trump really lost the popular vote fair and square.

More Info About Your Candidates

Here is what your ballot will cover on Election Day.

Get informed and prepared to make your voice heard.

Review national and local voter guides on PollVault to get more informed.

Arkansas Election Info

Upcoming Elections in Your State

2016 General Election: Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

Voter Registration Deadline: Monday, October 10, 2016.

For more information, visit the Arkansas Secretary of State’s website.

Election Day: Polls are open from 7:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Central Time on Election Day.

Early Voting: Early voting begins at 8:00 a.m. Central Time on Monday, October 24, 2016. Early voting is then available between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and between 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays. Early voting closes at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 7, 2016.

How to Find Your Polling Place on Election Day: Visit the Arkansas Secretary of State’s voter view website to find your polling location.

Early Voting Locations: In most counties, early voting is conducted at the county clerk’s office. Some counties may choose to conduct off-site early voting (a location other than the county clerk’s office), and local newspapers regularly publish the designated sites. Voters can contact their county clerk’s office to confirm their early voting location. The location of all Arkansas county clerks’ offices and their contact information can be found on the Secretary of State’s website.

REGISTER TO VOTE HERE

Already registered? Verify your voter registration status.


Registration Deadlines: You must register to vote 30 days prior to the General Election. The deadline to register for this year’s General Election is Monday, October 10, 2016.

How to Check Your Registration: Use Arkansas’s voter view website or call (1-866-OUR-VOTE).

Registration Eligibility: In order to be eligible to register to vote in Arkansas, you must:

  • Be a citizen of the United States;
  • Be an Arkansas resident (residing in Arkansas at least 30 days before the first election in which you will vote);
  • Be at least 18 years old on or before Election Day;
  • Not be barred from voting due to a felony conviction (if your felony conviction has been discharged or pardoned, you are eligible to vote);
  • Not have been adjudged as mentally incompetent by a court of competent jurisdiction.

How to Register: Arkansas residents may register to vote in person or by mail.

Register to Vote in Person

  • You can fill out an application to register to vote at your local:
  • County clerk’s office in your home county;
  • Driver Services or State Revenue Office;
  • Public library or Arkansas State Library;
  • Public assistance agency;
  • Disability agency;
  • Military recruitment office;
  • Arkansas National Guard office;
  • Voter registration drive.

Register to Vote by Mail

In order to register to vote by mail, you must obtain a mail-in registration form by:

  • Picking up a form from any of the locations where you can register to vote in person (listed above) and then mailing it in;
  • Contacting your county clerk’s office to request that they mail you a form;
  • Requesting the form to be mailed to you through the Arkansas Secretary of State’s website;
  • Printing the form, which is available on the Arkansas Secretary of State’s website in English or Spanish, and mailing it in;
  • Calling the Arkansas Secretary of State Elections Division at (1-800-247-3312) to request that they mail you a form.

Identification Required for Registration

You must provide some form of identification to register. You may provide either your driver’s license number or the last four digits of your Social Security number on your Arkansas Voter Registration Application, or you should check the box on the application to indicate that you possess neither.

If you do not possess either a driver’s license or Social Security number, you should submit a photocopy of one of the following with your mail-in application, or bring the documents with you at the time of voting:

  • Current and valid photo identification (especially one that has your address listed – some County Clerks require the ID to have an address);
  • A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check or paycheck that shows your name and address; or
  • Other government document that shows your name and address.

If You Want to Vote Early

During presidential election years, early voting begins 15 days prior to Election Day.

This year, early voting begins at 8:00 a.m. Central Time on Monday, October 24, 2016. Early voting is then available between the hours of 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m., Monday through Friday, and between 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. on Saturdays. Early voting closes at 5:00 p.m. on Monday, November 7, 2016.

In most counties, early voting is conducted at the county clerk’s office. Some counties may choose to conduct off-site early voting (a location other than the county clerk’s office), and local newspapers regularly publish the designated sites. Voters can contact their county clerk’s office to confirm their early voting location. The location of all Arkansas county clerks’ offices and their contact information can be found on the Secretary of State’s website.

If You Want to Vote Absentee

You may cast an absent ballot if you:

  • Will be unavoidably absent from your polling site on Election Day;
  • Will be unable to attend your polling site on Election Day due to illness or physical disability;
  • Reside in a long-term care or residential facility licensed by the state;
  • Are a member of the Uniformed Services, merchant marines or the spouse of a dependent family member and are away from your polling location due to the member’s active duty status;
  • Are a United States citizen whose residence is in Arkansas but is temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the U.S.

To receive an absentee ballot, you can either pick up an absentee ballot application from your county clerk or request to have one sent to you by contacting your county clerk’s office in the county where you are registered to vote. You can also download an absentee ballot application directly from the Secretary of State’s website. When you submit your application for an absentee ballot, you may designate how you wish to receive your ballot—whether in person, by mail, or by designated bearer.


Absentee Voting Rules and Deadlines

Deadlines for Submission of Absentee Voting Application:

  • In person: by close of business the day before the election—Monday, November 7, 2016.
  • By mail or electronic means: by seven days before the election—Tuesday, November 1, 2016.
  • By designated bearer or administrator: by close of business the day before the election—Monday, November 7, 2016.
  • By authorized agent: by 1:30 p.m. on Election Day—Tuesday, November 8, 2016. The authorized agent must file with the County Clerk an affidavit from the administrative head of a hospital or nursing home located in Arkansas verifying that the applicant is a patient of the hospital or long-term care or residential care facility licensed by the state and is thereby unable to vote on Election Day at their regular polling site.

Deadlines for Ballot Pickup & Delivery of Voted Ballot to County Clerk:

  • In person: Ballots must be delivered by close of business the day before the election—Monday, November 7, 2016.
  • By mail: Ballots must be delivered by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day—Tuesday, November 8, 2016.
  • By designated bearer: Ballots may be picked up no earlier than 15 days before the election—Monday, October 24, 2016. Ballots must be delivered by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day—Tuesday, November 8, 2016.
  • By authorized agent: Ballots must be delivered by 7:30 p.m. on Election Day—Tuesday, November 8, 2016.

Identification Requirements to Cast a Ballot

Although poll workers are required by law to ask voters to provide identification, you may choose not to show identification if you so wish. You are entitled to cast a regular ballot even if you choose not to provide identification, with one exception.

The only exception is (1) if this is your first time voting and (2) if you did not submit identification with your registration application (see above for “Identification Required for Registration”). If you did not submit identification with your voter registration application, then you must bring one of the forms of identification with you when you vote. If you forget to bring the identification, you are entitled to cast a provisional ballot.

VoteRiders has created Arkansas voter ID info cards in English and in Spanish.

Moving within the Same County

When you move within the same county in Arkansas, you should update your registration information with the county clerk. If you fail to update your information prior to Election Day, may vote at the polling site for your new address. The election officials should contact the county clerk to confirm that you are a registered voter within the county and that your new address corresponds to the polling site, and once this is confirmed, you may cast a regular ballot after filling out an updated voter registration application form there.

If the election official cannot confirm your registration in the county, you are entitled to cast a provisional ballot regardless of whether your name appears on the polling site’s voter registration list. As part of the provisional ballot, you will be asked to sign a statement affirming your eligibility to vote. The election official is then required to provide you with written instructions on how to determine whether your provisional vote is counted or, if not, the reason the vote was not counted.

In those counties with electronic voting centers, you should be permitted to vote at any polling site within the county.

Moving Between Counties

Moving across county lines in Arkansas requires transferring your voter registration to the new county. You should submit your updated registration to the county clerk in your new county no later than four days before the election—Thursday, November 3, 2016. If you forget to transfer your registration from another county or if your application arrives in the new county less than four days before the election, you should ask to cast a provisional ballot.

Military and other overseas citizens may use the standard procedure for absentee voting by mail, but there are also special provisions for members of the U.S. Armed Forces and merchant marine, commissioned corps of the Public Health Service and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, along with family members of all these groups, and other citizens who reside outside the United States (together these groups are called UOCAVA voters).

Registering and Requesting an Absentee Ballot

UOCAVA voters can register using the standard procedure for registration, listed above, or they can submit the Military and Overseas Request Form on the Arkansas Secretary of State’s website to request that an application be sent by regular mail or email. UOCAVA voters can also use the Federal Post Card Application to register to vote. UOCAVA voters may also register to vote and request an absentee ballot by calling (1-800-274-VOTE).

UOCAVA voters should ensure that they register to vote thirty days prior to the General Election—Monday, October 10, 2016.

To request an absentee ballot, UOCAVA voters may submit the Arkansas application or use the Federal Post Card Application. You should try to complete your absentee ballot request as soon as possible so that your ballot will be sent to you in time for you to mark it and return it to your county clerk.

UOCAVA voters may also request that an absentee ballot be sent to them by either mail or by electronic means. The ballot delivery system “Ballot Safe” will be used in 2016 to allow UOCAVA voters to receive their absentee ballot through a secure online website. After a qualified voter has requested an absentee ballot, the voter will receive a confirmation email with instructions on how to log into the secure site. The voter will download the ballot and other necessary documents, such as a Voter Statement, instructions and envelope templates. The ballot should be marked before the polls close in Arkansas on Election Day. Ballots from UOCAVA voters must be received no later than ten days after the election. The deadline for the General Election is 5:00 p.m. on November 18, 2016.

After the ballot is mailed, the voter can check back on the secure site to track the status of the ballot and confirm when their county clerk has received it.

Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot

The Federal Write-in Absentee Ballot (FWAB) is a back-up ballot that can be used by UOCAVA voters. You can use the FWAB whether you are located inside or outside the United States (including APO and FPO addresses), provided that you are away from your voting residence for service-related activities. You must apply for a regular ballot early enough for your local election officials to receive the request at least 7 days before the election—Tuesday, November 1, 2016. If you do not receive your regular ballot in time, you should use the FWAB. For specific instructions, visit the Arkansas-specific FWAB page.

Your right to vote is only affected if you have been convicted of a felony. Charges do not affect your right to vote. Misdemeanors do not affect your right to vote. 

If you have been convicted of a felony in Arkansas, you can vote if you are not currently incarcerated or on probation or on parole. To restore your right to vote, you must take proof of your discharge and proof that you have paid all probation or parole fees, court costs, fines, or restitution to your local county clerk. It is recommended that you collect these records at the time of your discharge or as soon as possible thereafter and retain copies of these records as they may be increasingly difficult to obtain as time goes by. Once your local county clerk has received this proof, you are eligible to register to vote.

FAQ

Top Issues to Field

For more information for voters with disabilities, find a National Disability Rights Network partner in your area.

For more information for student voters, visit the Student Voting Guide from the Brennan Center for Justice.

Information provided by Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights

Voting as a Student

As a student, you have a constitutional right to register and vote in the place you truly consider to be “home” — whether that’s your parents’ house, your apartment, or your dorm room. But before you make the important decision about where to vote, make sure you know the voting rules (and sometimes consequences) of registering to vote in that state.

More Info On Student Voting

Rock the Vote Reminders

Don't miss any important deadlines.

You Rock!

We'll be in touch and see you at the polls!

OR TEXT "ROCK" TO 788683

Msg & Data Rates May Apply. Text STOP to opt out or HELP for help. Expect 1 to 2 msgs/mo. Privacy Policy

2016 Election Information for your state